Unbranded; without a registered trademark.

 

The New Yorker:

What have we been robbed of, by his death? Not so much a movie star, I think, as somebody who took our dramatic taxonomy—all those lazy, useful terms by which we like to classify and patronize our performers, even the best ones—and threw it away. Leading man, character actor, supporting player: really, who gives a damn? Either you hold an audience, so tight that it feels lashed to the seats, or you don’t. That is why the distinction between Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor, at the Academy Awards, grows ever more ludicrous—essential, of course, to the smooth structure of the night, but untrue, in the long run, to the way in which we feed on film, or store it away for lavish future consumption.

What is the meaning of the line “Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown”?

Something horrible happens, a great injustice is done, powerful people get away with abusing that power, corruption continues and the weaker people must suffer for it — and that’s the way of things. In Chinatown, in the country, in the world.
"Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown" means "you can’t change things, it’s the way things are and the way they will be, regardless of how much you tilt at windmills." The line is about the futility of fighting injustices and darkness in the world. It’s about giving up and looking away, because nothing can be done anyway lest you become another casualty of injustice.
Chinatown is the world. Jake is everyone. Forgetting about it is what we all do anyway, and so what we may as well keep doing.

What is the meaning of the line “Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown”?

Something horrible happens, a great injustice is done, powerful people get away with abusing that power, corruption continues and the weaker people must suffer for it — and that’s the way of things. In Chinatown, in the country, in the world.

"Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown" means "you can’t change things, it’s the way things are and the way they will be, regardless of how much you tilt at windmills." The line is about the futility of fighting injustices and darkness in the world. It’s about giving up and looking away, because nothing can be done anyway lest you become another casualty of injustice.

Chinatown is the world. Jake is everyone. Forgetting about it is what we all do anyway, and so what we may as well keep doing.

Paul Newman is the least starlike superstar I’ve ever worked with. He’s an educated man and a trained actor and he never wants more close-ups. What he wants is the best possible script and character he can have. And he loves to be surrounded by the finest actors available, because he believes the better they are, the better the picture’s apt to be, the better he’ll come out. Many stars, maybe even most, don’t want that competition.

We walked the back lanes of Westport and it all went well. But what I remember most about it was that Newman carried a handful of pebbles and I noticed that whenever a car drove by, he was always in the act of tossing a pebble into the woods, so that his back was to the street. It’s hard not to notice Paul Newman and he was doing all he could to talk and not be stared at.

William Goldman, Adventures in the Screen Trade (via kim-kelly)

"Back home, they would have put me in jail for what I’m doing. Here, they’re giving me awards."
-Casino, 1995

"Back home, they would have put me in jail for what I’m doing. Here, they’re giving me awards."

-Casino, 1995

And quite possibly the best title for a collection of reviews.

And quite possibly the best title for a collection of reviews.

When auteurs talk about “liquid narratives” and alternative mental states for viewing their film, it usually means it has a shitty plot.

I’ll buy the ticket out of soft-core prurience and to get some closure on the Disney 2000s. But there has to be a word for entertainment you purchase out of a sense of obligation, just to keep up with the zeitgeist.

It may be awesome. Franco may do for Kevin Federline what Johnny Depp did for Keith Richards. But this interview is about as red as the flag gets for me.

was Oblivion good? (spoiler free please) And how did you get into a test screening?

It was okay. Its problem is that it’s a suspense thriller and the previews have already revealed most of the plot by the time you’re sitting in the theater.

The few questions that aren’t answered in the preview aren’t really answered by the end of the film, either.

The screening was a random invite thing.

"Mark Strong is credited with inventing the ‘but’ movie credits game. In 2012, he suggested to his friends, film critics Mark Kermode and Simon Mayo, that during opening film credits, rather than an ‘and’ there should be a ‘but’ in the titles to warn the public of the upcoming appearance of a bad actor. So while Apocalypse Now would read ‘starring Martin Sheen, Marlon Brando…and Harrison Ford’, a movie like Django Unchained would read ‘starring Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, Kerry Washington…BUT Quentin Tarantino.’ Listeners to Kermode and Mayo’s weekly radio show have come up with an endless number of movies where the ‘but’ would be applicable. In early 2013, while on the radio show, Strong suggested that one day he probably would be ‘hoisted by my own petard’."

"Mark Strong is credited with inventing the ‘but’ movie credits game. In 2012, he suggested to his friends, film critics Mark Kermode and Simon Mayo, that during opening film credits, rather than an ‘and’ there should be a ‘but’ in the titles to warn the public of the upcoming appearance of a bad actor. So while Apocalypse Now would read ‘starring Martin Sheen, Marlon Brando…and Harrison Ford’, a movie like Django Unchained would read ‘starring Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, Kerry Washington…BUT Quentin Tarantino.’ Listeners to Kermode and Mayo’s weekly radio show have come up with an endless number of movies where the ‘but’ would be applicable. In early 2013, while on the radio show, Strong suggested that one day he probably would be ‘hoisted by my own petard’."

Whoa.
Soderbergh’s new film about Liberace has been labeled by the studios as TOO GAY FOR THEATERS. That’s like saying your beer tastes too much like beer.
Incidentally, I believe that’s a 1967 C2 Corvette coupe. Could be wrong.

Whoa.

Soderbergh’s new film about Liberace has been labeled by the studios as TOO GAY FOR THEATERS. That’s like saying your beer tastes too much like beer.

Incidentally, I believe that’s a 1967 C2 Corvette coupe. Could be wrong.

I wish I could’ve shown this clip to so, so many aspiring actresses.

In Hollywood, though, not all quadrants are created equal. If you, for instance, have a vagina, you’re pretty much out of luck, because women, in studio thinking, are considered a niche audience that, except when Sandra Bullock reads a script or Nicholas Sparks writes a novel, generally isn’t worth taking the time to figure out. And if you were born before 1985… well, it is my sad duty to inform you that in the eyes of Hollywood, you are one of what the kids on the Internet call “the olds.” I know—you thought you were one of the kids on the Internet. Not to the studios, which have realized that the closer you get to (or the farther you get from) your thirtieth birthday, the more likely you are to develop things like taste and discernment, which render you such an exhausting proposition in terms of selling a movie that, well, you might as well have a vagina.

This is why I hate new movies (via acordova)