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doublejack:

azspot:

Trickle-up economics

And then you’ll pull your hair out for 30+ years as the rest of the country entirely fails to grasp this amazingly obvious fact.

"Voodoo economic policy" - George H. W. Bush, who knew it for a hustle as early as April 14th, 1980.

doublejack:

azspot:

Trickle-up economics

And then you’ll pull your hair out for 30+ years as the rest of the country entirely fails to grasp this amazingly obvious fact.

"Voodoo economic policy" - George H. W. Bush, who knew it for a hustle as early as April 14th, 1980.

AA Gill:

As the commissioner drives me back to the train station in the dawn, he asks why we can’t drink like the continentals: a glass of wine with some tapas in a cafe, all ages together; a glass of beer, an aperitif, then the passeggiata, dressing up smartly. Why can’t we change the culture? I look at him and keep my mouth shut. At the station a fox trots down the line, a drunk is sprawled over a bench. “Why don’t we drink like the Greeks or the Italians?”
Really? Because we have a choice, that’s why. Because we’re from the north, from the cold, from the drizzle, from the place where the moon drives us nuts. Who would want to drink like an Italian granny? Sip wine with a raised pinky, chew a carrot, when you could be out there with all your mates, people you fancy, people you don’t, people you shag, people you wanted to. You can go mad, get totally muntered. You can let go. Why have a polite chat when you can have a legend? When you can weave a myth that will last you all week, that will stay with you for ever? Why would you want to ponce about in the grottoes of Dionysus when you can get trollied in the mead halls of Valhalla? This is who we are, this is what we do — or what I did.
I don’t miss drink, ever. Being an alcoholic is not the same as being drunk. But I look at these kids in this thin, worn-out, underprivileged, unlovable corner of England and I think: how brilliant that they can still get out and manufacture this much enthusiasm, fun and mad entertainment, this much togetherness and community and hope out of so little, such meagre education, so few jobs and prospects. The drink, drugs and music are not just their culture, they’re their achievement.

AA Gill:

As the commissioner drives me back to the train station in the dawn, he asks why we can’t drink like the continentals: a glass of wine with some tapas in a cafe, all ages together; a glass of beer, an aperitif, then the passeggiata, dressing up smartly. Why can’t we change the culture? I look at him and keep my mouth shut. At the station a fox trots down the line, a drunk is sprawled over a bench. “Why don’t we drink like the Greeks or the Italians?”

Really? Because we have a choice, that’s why. Because we’re from the north, from the cold, from the drizzle, from the place where the moon drives us nuts. Who would want to drink like an Italian granny? Sip wine with a raised pinky, chew a carrot, when you could be out there with all your mates, people you fancy, people you don’t, people you shag, people you wanted to. You can go mad, get totally muntered. You can let go. Why have a polite chat when you can have a legend? When you can weave a myth that will last you all week, that will stay with you for ever? Why would you want to ponce about in the grottoes of Dionysus when you can get trollied in the mead halls of Valhalla? This is who we are, this is what we do — or what I did.

I don’t miss drink, ever. Being an alcoholic is not the same as being drunk. But I look at these kids in this thin, worn-out, underprivileged, unlovable corner of England and I think: how brilliant that they can still get out and manufacture this much enthusiasm, fun and mad entertainment, this much togetherness and community and hope out of so little, such meagre education, so few jobs and prospects. The drink, drugs and music are not just their culture, they’re their achievement.

But the powers that be have found turning adults into debt slaves as early as possible to be a brilliant bit of social engineering, forcing the young to stay in line lest they mar their employment prospects. And as long as the powers that be continued to be successful in pitting the young against the old rather than against their common enemies, a predatory and extractive financial services industry and a super-wealthly class that prefers to mine rather than develop the countries in which they hold investments, it’s unlikely that either group will escape the grim future that the neofeudalists are in the process of creating.

Student Debt is Crushing the Economic Future of the Young (via azspot)

Highly recommended: David Graeber’s 'Debt: The First 1000 Years'

(via wilwheaton)

"Neofeudalists" is my second favorite new term of 2013. Following very closely on the heels of "analog fetishism."

"It is the wretchedness of being rich that you have to live with rich people."
-Logan P. Smith

"It is the wretchedness of being rich that you have to live with rich people."

-Logan P. Smith