Unbranded; without a registered trademark.

 

humansofnewyork:

"I know this isn’t going to be a popular opinion, but I’m gay, and I don’t think there’s nearly as much discrimination as people claim. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve experienced discrimination. But it hasn’t been a huge factor in my life. I feel like a lot of people bring discrimination on themselves by getting in people’s faces too much. They like to say: ‘Accept me or else!’ They go around demanding respect as a member of a group, instead of earning respect as an individual. And that sort of behavior invites discrimination. I’ve never demanded respect because I was gay, and I haven’t experienced much discrimination when people find out that I am."

Oh hi there white dude. Choice gig we got, amirite? Especially when it cross-pollinates. If your top two privileges mitigate any minority status you might have, go right ahead and attribute success to your sweet-ass temperament. And while we’re at it, let’s pretend class hasn’t played a role, either.
But you should keep on condescending to those who carry torches and pitchforks, while you fight the Good Fight in that bastion of intolerance, New York fucking City, for chrissakes.

humansofnewyork:

"I know this isn’t going to be a popular opinion, but I’m gay, and I don’t think there’s nearly as much discrimination as people claim. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve experienced discrimination. But it hasn’t been a huge factor in my life. I feel like a lot of people bring discrimination on themselves by getting in people’s faces too much. They like to say: ‘Accept me or else!’ They go around demanding respect as a member of a group, instead of earning respect as an individual. And that sort of behavior invites discrimination. I’ve never demanded respect because I was gay, and I haven’t experienced much discrimination when people find out that I am."

Oh hi there white dude. Choice gig we got, amirite? Especially when it cross-pollinates. If your top two privileges mitigate any minority status you might have, go right ahead and attribute success to your sweet-ass temperament. And while we’re at it, let’s pretend class hasn’t played a role, either.

But you should keep on condescending to those who carry torches and pitchforks, while you fight the Good Fight in that bastion of intolerance, New York fucking City, for chrissakes.

Everyone Thinks I'm Gay (But I'm Not)

You may have heard: they legalized same-sex marriage in Illinois today. It’s getting hard to keep track. If you’re anything like me, you’re doing back-of-the-envelope calculations to see how close we are to the tipping point: When do more Americans live in states where it’s legal, than don’t? 
It’s an important symbol. We give majorities vast powers. When a majority of Americans have legalized SSM, you go to the Supreme Court and say:
Lawyer: “Shouldn’t this be legal everywhere?”
Scalia: ”Marriage is decided by the states.”
Lawyer: ”Except when it’s not.”
Justice Thomas: ….
Justice Roberts: “The states are all eventually doing it on their own.”
Lawyer: “Mississippi is never going to do jack shit on its own.”
Sotomayor/Kagan/Breyer/Kennedy/Ginsburg: “Agreed.”
Boom. Rainbow flags everywhere. Sodomy in the streets. 
NY, CA, NJ and IL are really populous. How close are we?
(Disclaimer: This will be the first and last time I do math on this blog. It may be incorrect.)
Just like electoral math, right? You figure there are about 313 million of us, half of that is 157 million. The states in blue add up to roughly 118 million. So we need 39 million Americans to stop being bigoted assholes.
The striped states don’t put you over the top, but the striped states plus a combination of certain pink ones do. The Olds down in Florida are out of play, so the smart money’s on Pennsylvania.
Why does it always come down to Pennsylvania? No idea. But here we are again.

You may have heard: they legalized same-sex marriage in Illinois today. It’s getting hard to keep track. If you’re anything like me, you’re doing back-of-the-envelope calculations to see how close we are to the tipping point: When do more Americans live in states where it’s legal, than don’t?

It’s an important symbol. We give majorities vast powers. When a majority of Americans have legalized SSM, you go to the Supreme Court and say:

Lawyer: “Shouldn’t this be legal everywhere?”

Scalia: ”Marriage is decided by the states.”

Lawyer: ”Except when it’s not.”

Justice Thomas: ….

Justice Roberts: “The states are all eventually doing it on their own.”

Lawyer: “Mississippi is never going to do jack shit on its own.”

Sotomayor/Kagan/Breyer/Kennedy/Ginsburg: “Agreed.”

Boom. Rainbow flags everywhere. Sodomy in the streets. 

NY, CA, NJ and IL are really populous. How close are we?

(Disclaimer: This will be the first and last time I do math on this blog. It may be incorrect.)

Just like electoral math, right? You figure there are about 313 million of us, half of that is 157 million. The states in blue add up to roughly 118 million. So we need 39 million Americans to stop being bigoted assholes.

The striped states don’t put you over the top, but the striped states plus a combination of certain pink ones do. The Olds down in Florida are out of play, so the smart money’s on Pennsylvania.

Why does it always come down to Pennsylvania? No idea. But here we are again.

nprfreshair:

New York Times Supreme Court correspondent Adam Liptak tells Terry Gross about the language in the DOMA opinion and how it might influence the future of gay issues in the courts:
"So this decision delivers benefits to people married in the 13 states that now allow same sex marriage. It doesn’t do anything in the other states, but it has language in it that really resonates. It says, ‘Discriminating against gay couples that want to marry demeans them and humiliates their children,’ and that’s a punch in the gut. That’s language that Justice Kennedy wrote from the heart and it’s in keeping with a trend in public opinion. So I can certainly imagine in more liberal states judges adopting just that language to strike down bans on same sex marriage.”

nprfreshair:

New York Times Supreme Court correspondent Adam Liptak tells Terry Gross about the language in the DOMA opinion and how it might influence the future of gay issues in the courts:

"So this decision delivers benefits to people married in the 13 states that now allow same sex marriage. It doesn’t do anything in the other states, but it has language in it that really resonates. It says, ‘Discriminating against gay couples that want to marry demeans them and humiliates their children,’ and that’s a punch in the gut. That’s language that Justice Kennedy wrote from the heart and it’s in keeping with a trend in public opinion. So I can certainly imagine in more liberal states judges adopting just that language to strike down bans on same sex marriage.”

Got my first shot of testosterone today

andrue2:

No joke, it hurt less than the blood they took this morning.

My doctor explained the entire process, let me watch the injection, etc.

Not sure how I feel right now, as a non-binary person taking T. I suppose I’ll let you know when I figure it out.

That said, my father was utterly horrid to me last weekend at my brother’s wedding. Negative to the core, and cornering me in a car (it was pouring rain outside so I couldn’t exactly leave unless I wanted to destroy my dress clothing) before the wedding rehearsal and railing about how terrible and inappropriate I looked in a suit, how I just wanted attention, blah, blah, blah.

I should mention I’m 29, that he lives 3,600 miles away from me and I don’t depend on either parent financially and haven’t for years. So treating me like a 12 year old rebellious child — particularly when my brother and his then-fiance had OKed my choice of attire a month beforehand, and even asked me to do a reading at the church in lieu of being a bridesmaid — was utterly inappropriate and even a tad immature on his part.

By the end of the trip, I was just a mess, self-confidence-wise. I’d even considered canceling the appointment today because I was to the point where I didn’t know if I even wanted to transition if that was the reaction I was going to get.

Then I reminded myself that all my other relatives I’d talked to had been supportive, and my father can be a royal douchecanoe, the end.

And now the first shot is done and I can go back to being my geeky, San Francisco living-and-loving, out-at-work transmasucline odd-ball self.

My only regret is that I have but two thumbs-up to give.

“They get so religiously extreme that they deny reality. They’re like, ‘Gay doesn’t exist. You don’t see gay in the natural world.’ You know what I don’t see as much in the natural world? Angels—those are half-human, half-bird creatures, everybody. The devil is half-man, half-goat. 
I’ve seen more gays, is all I’m saying.”
—Myq Kaplan

They get so religiously extreme that they deny reality. They’re like, ‘Gay doesn’t exist. You don’t see gay in the natural world.’ You know what I don’t see as much in the natural world? Angels—those are half-human, half-bird creatures, everybody. The devil is half-man, half-goat.

I’ve seen more gays, is all I’m saying.

—Myq Kaplan

This is dense:

"As public opinion has changed, it begins to look more like bias and less reasonable to simply categorically remove same-sex couples" from marriage, said Jane Schacter, a professor of constitutional law at Stanford University. "I don’t think the court checks the polls. It’s more how the court weighs the arguments. As ideas become more familiar, they seem less foreign and radical and odd.”

Emphasis mine.

I’m pretty sure the swing votes on the Supreme Court are acutely aware of poll findings. Especially since public opinion is discussed in written arguments, not to mention whatever’s in all those amicus briefs, not to mention whatever comes up during the hurly-burly of oral argument.

And while we’re at the water cooler, what’s an election but a verified poll taken during a prearranged time?

It’s one thing for elected officials to say the Supreme Court isn’t influenced by political concerns, but it’s sort of insulting for an expert on statutory interpretation to say it to a reporter with a straight face.

You kind of suck, Professor Schacter.

Whoa.
Soderbergh’s new film about Liberace has been labeled by the studios as TOO GAY FOR THEATERS. That’s like saying your beer tastes too much like beer.
Incidentally, I believe that’s a 1967 C2 Corvette coupe. Could be wrong.

Whoa.

Soderbergh’s new film about Liberace has been labeled by the studios as TOO GAY FOR THEATERS. That’s like saying your beer tastes too much like beer.

Incidentally, I believe that’s a 1967 C2 Corvette coupe. Could be wrong.