Unbranded; without a registered trademark.

 

AA Gill:

As the commissioner drives me back to the train station in the dawn, he asks why we can’t drink like the continentals: a glass of wine with some tapas in a cafe, all ages together; a glass of beer, an aperitif, then the passeggiata, dressing up smartly. Why can’t we change the culture? I look at him and keep my mouth shut. At the station a fox trots down the line, a drunk is sprawled over a bench. “Why don’t we drink like the Greeks or the Italians?”
Really? Because we have a choice, that’s why. Because we’re from the north, from the cold, from the drizzle, from the place where the moon drives us nuts. Who would want to drink like an Italian granny? Sip wine with a raised pinky, chew a carrot, when you could be out there with all your mates, people you fancy, people you don’t, people you shag, people you wanted to. You can go mad, get totally muntered. You can let go. Why have a polite chat when you can have a legend? When you can weave a myth that will last you all week, that will stay with you for ever? Why would you want to ponce about in the grottoes of Dionysus when you can get trollied in the mead halls of Valhalla? This is who we are, this is what we do — or what I did.
I don’t miss drink, ever. Being an alcoholic is not the same as being drunk. But I look at these kids in this thin, worn-out, underprivileged, unlovable corner of England and I think: how brilliant that they can still get out and manufacture this much enthusiasm, fun and mad entertainment, this much togetherness and community and hope out of so little, such meagre education, so few jobs and prospects. The drink, drugs and music are not just their culture, they’re their achievement.

AA Gill:

As the commissioner drives me back to the train station in the dawn, he asks why we can’t drink like the continentals: a glass of wine with some tapas in a cafe, all ages together; a glass of beer, an aperitif, then the passeggiata, dressing up smartly. Why can’t we change the culture? I look at him and keep my mouth shut. At the station a fox trots down the line, a drunk is sprawled over a bench. “Why don’t we drink like the Greeks or the Italians?”

Really? Because we have a choice, that’s why. Because we’re from the north, from the cold, from the drizzle, from the place where the moon drives us nuts. Who would want to drink like an Italian granny? Sip wine with a raised pinky, chew a carrot, when you could be out there with all your mates, people you fancy, people you don’t, people you shag, people you wanted to. You can go mad, get totally muntered. You can let go. Why have a polite chat when you can have a legend? When you can weave a myth that will last you all week, that will stay with you for ever? Why would you want to ponce about in the grottoes of Dionysus when you can get trollied in the mead halls of Valhalla? This is who we are, this is what we do — or what I did.

I don’t miss drink, ever. Being an alcoholic is not the same as being drunk. But I look at these kids in this thin, worn-out, underprivileged, unlovable corner of England and I think: how brilliant that they can still get out and manufacture this much enthusiasm, fun and mad entertainment, this much togetherness and community and hope out of so little, such meagre education, so few jobs and prospects. The drink, drugs and music are not just their culture, they’re their achievement.

It’s as good as you’ve heard.
Can’t say it lives up to the hype; there was none.

It’s as good as you’ve heard.

Can’t say it lives up to the hype; there was none.

It ain’t broke. Fuck off. She’s perfect.

It ain’t broke. Fuck off. She’s perfect.

Played 19 times

"… the past didn’t go anywhere, did it? It’s right here, right now. I always thought that anybody who told me I couldn’t live in the past was trying to get me to forget something that if I remembered it, it would get them in serious trouble. No, that 50s, 60s, 70s, 90s stuff, that whole idea of decade packaging, things don’t happen that way …

No, that packaging of time is a journalistic convenience that they use to trivialize and to dismiss important events and important ideas. I defy that.” 

― Utah Phillips

Longtime readers of this space know which part of Accidental Racist would troll me the hardest: the popularity of the Confederate flag.
The song will come and go, but the treasonous, racist symbol (whose design is far superior to the American flag) will still be displayed everywhere south of the Mason-Dixon.
Brad Paisley implies the flag is about Southern Heritage, as though from the distant, sepia-toned past. He’s wrong. Southerners weren’t using it until the Civil Rights movement.
politicalprof:

 From 1865 (the end of the Civil War) until the 1950s SOUTHERNERS DID NOT USE THE “REBEL FLAG” AS A SYMBOL OF “NATIONAL” PRIDE OR “SOUTHERN” IDENTITY.
In the 1950s, the Civil Rights Movement began advocating for racial change around the US, and particularly in the South. Members sought the end of Jim Crow and to have full rights as citizens of the United States, which they had been denied since at least the end of Reconstruction in 1877.
In response, many Southerners adopted the Confederate Battle Flag as a symbol of resistance to federal efforts to end Jim Crow and to end segregation. Just as Southerners fought the federal government to protect slavery and states’ rights, they would now fight the federal government to protect segregation and states’ rights.
The Rebel Flag was, is and remains a symbol of a movement that would have, in its time, protected slavery, and would, today, protect segregation and racial bias. The notion that it is a naive symbol of a culture is utter nonsense.

It isn’t about slavery per se, it’s about segregation. In the 20th century, the Stars and Bars were a kind of campaign logo for Jim Crow laws, which didn’t end until 1965.
That wasn’t very long ago. Using a Confederate flag as a segregationist symbol is well within living memory. When Dixiecrats heard Martin Luther King was shot, they flew that flag on their front porch in support of the shooter. 
There’s a 55 year old black man working in downtown Atlanta right now. He can remember having to use “Colored” drinking fountains when he was in second grade. He can remember “Whites Only” counters and moving to the back of the bus. He’s not from the distant past. He’s still in the workforce. He’s a full decade away from retirement. This hypothetical black man might not even have stayed in the South. He might be your boss or your coworker. He could be Stanley from The Office (actor Leslie Baker, age 55). In fact, he’s only 10 years older than LL Cool J, who turned 45 this year.

Longtime readers of this space know which part of Accidental Racist would troll me the hardest: the popularity of the Confederate flag.

The song will come and go, but the treasonous, racist symbol (whose design is far superior to the American flag) will still be displayed everywhere south of the Mason-Dixon.

Brad Paisley implies the flag is about Southern Heritage, as though from the distant, sepia-toned past. He’s wrong. Southerners weren’t using it until the Civil Rights movement.

politicalprof:

  •  From 1865 (the end of the Civil War) until the 1950s SOUTHERNERS DID NOT USE THE “REBEL FLAG” AS A SYMBOL OF “NATIONAL” PRIDE OR “SOUTHERN” IDENTITY.
  • In the 1950s, the Civil Rights Movement began advocating for racial change around the US, and particularly in the South. Members sought the end of Jim Crow and to have full rights as citizens of the United States, which they had been denied since at least the end of Reconstruction in 1877.
  • In response, many Southerners adopted the Confederate Battle Flag as a symbol of resistance to federal efforts to end Jim Crow and to end segregation. Just as Southerners fought the federal government to protect slavery and states’ rights, they would now fight the federal government to protect segregation and states’ rights.
  • The Rebel Flag was, is and remains a symbol of a movement that would have, in its time, protected slavery, and would, today, protect segregation and racial bias. The notion that it is a naive symbol of a culture is utter nonsense.

It isn’t about slavery per se, it’s about segregation. In the 20th century, the Stars and Bars were a kind of campaign logo for Jim Crow laws, which didn’t end until 1965.

That wasn’t very long ago. Using a Confederate flag as a segregationist symbol is well within living memory. When Dixiecrats heard Martin Luther King was shot, they flew that flag on their front porch in support of the shooter. 

There’s a 55 year old black man working in downtown Atlanta right now. He can remember having to use “Colored” drinking fountains when he was in second grade. He can remember “Whites Only” counters and moving to the back of the bus. He’s not from the distant past. He’s still in the workforce. He’s a full decade away from retirement. This hypothetical black man might not even have stayed in the South. He might be your boss or your coworker. He could be Stanley from The Office (actor Leslie Baker, age 55). In fact, he’s only 10 years older than LL Cool J, who turned 45 this year.

"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music."
- Rachmaninov

"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music."

- Rachmaninov

Played 50 times

Bed Intruder Song

by Antoine Dodson and The Gregory Brothers, featuring Kelly Dodson

Played 179 times

It’s that time of year again.

Christmas Is All Around Me

-Billy Mack

Does he? Conventional wisdom says Ringo was an inferior musician compared to his fellow band mates. It’s not false modesty or a complex if it’s a correct evaluation of his talents vis-a-vis The Beatles.
And frankly, that’s not a knock on him. Not many musicians could have written “Yesterday" either.

Does he? Conventional wisdom says Ringo was an inferior musician compared to his fellow band mates. It’s not false modesty or a complex if it’s a correct evaluation of his talents vis-a-vis The Beatles.

And frankly, that’s not a knock on him. Not many musicians could have written “Yesterday" either.