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Original Sin: Why the GOP is and will continue to be the party of white people

It is not a coincidence that the resurgence of nullification is happening while our first African American president is in office …
We are left with the profound historical irony that the party of Lincoln—of the Gettysburg Address, with its reiteration of the Declaration’s assertion of equality and its vision of a “new birth of freedom”—has found sustenance in Lincoln’s principal intellectual and moral antagonist.
It has become the party of Calhoun.

Original Sin: Why the GOP is and will continue to be the party of white people

It is not a coincidence that the resurgence of nullification is happening while our first African American president is in office …

We are left with the profound historical irony that the party of Lincoln—of the Gettysburg Address, with its reiteration of the Declaration’s assertion of equality and its vision of a “new birth of freedom”—has found sustenance in Lincoln’s principal intellectual and moral antagonist.

It has become the party of Calhoun.

summerofmegadeth:

Oh shit, popular SPANK-BLOG WONKETTE is selling VINTAGE METALLICA TEEZ. Catch this NEVERENDING BLACK ALBUM TOUR design before it’s lost to the sands of time in all these WASTED YEARS once again.

Add to cart.

summerofmegadeth:

Oh shit, popular SPANK-BLOG WONKETTE is selling VINTAGE METALLICA TEEZ. Catch this NEVERENDING BLACK ALBUM TOUR design before it’s lost to the sands of time in all these WASTED YEARS once again.

Add to cart.

A new political voice?

squashed:

It’s started.

So, I predict we will start to hear a lot more from politically-connected Republicans who have lost primaries to candidates backed by Sarah Palin or the Tea Party. Some of the Republicans have, doubtlessly been holding their tongues for fear that criticizing some of the more absurd things we’ve heard from the far right will cost them their primary.

Well, they’ve lost their primary. Some are mad. And there’s no longer a reason to remain quiet.

Good. It’s time they took conservatism back. Interesting that losing power didn’t do the trick, but losing power within their own coalition did. Let’s see some of that tired old “Fight For The Soul of The Party” rhetoric. This time around it’ll have the additional weight of being true.

COWBOY UP.

"I ask you to judge me by the enemies  I have made."
- Franklin D. Roosevelt

"I ask you to judge me by the enemies I have made."

- Franklin D. Roosevelt

Diane Feinstein, centrist Senator from California, is well to the right of her constituency. And you notice it in the details. Here’s one of my photos from the San Francisco Tea Party a couple of months ago.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. They’re trying to make him look “shady.” Instead he just looks regrettably color-coordinated. Or from Miami.
Senator Barbara Boxer(?) Squalling. You know. As liberal women are prone to do.
Speaker Pelosi. Face stretched, hair enlarged? A reference to plastic surgery?
And… a totally normal picture of Diane Feinstein. Flattering, even.

Diane Feinstein, centrist Senator from California, is well to the right of her constituency. And you notice it in the details. Here’s one of my photos from the San Francisco Tea Party a couple of months ago.

  • Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. They’re trying to make him look “shady.” Instead he just looks regrettably color-coordinated. Or from Miami.
  • Senator Barbara Boxer(?) Squalling. You know. As liberal women are prone to do.
  • Speaker Pelosi. Face stretched, hair enlarged? A reference to plastic surgery?
  • And… a totally normal picture of Diane Feinstein. Flattering, even.
(via azspot)
Remember when cartoonists had to reach to craft a joke? Remember when the space between humor at the thing and the thing itself had to be illustrated for you?
No more. We’ve moved beyond satire with these people.

(via azspot)

Remember when cartoonists had to reach to craft a joke? Remember when the space between humor at the thing and the thing itself had to be illustrated for you?

No more. We’ve moved beyond satire with these people.

Last week our local eccentric called the teabaggers amateurs, the inside joke being that, compared to Frank Chu, everyone’s an amateur. Despite the fact that he’s certifiable, he’s also sponsored by a web hosting service. He’s about as close to a professional protester as a person can get.

But the larger joke is that Frank Chu has more in common with the teabaggers than the latter would care to admit. Do a little digging and you’ll find he’s a Republican. Ask what he’s protesting and he’ll spout some paranoid fantasy about U.S. Presidents cheating him out of money. He harbors a particular distaste for corporations. Behind all those linguistically challenged signs lies a fantastic sense of injury.
Sound like anyone else we know? Ahem. 
All things considered, Frank and the teabaggers are simpatico. He needs the media circus to thrive and he’s nothing if not a publicity-hound. The teabaggers fall squarely in that category. So why the disdain? Where did that uncharacteristically lucid remark come from?
Maybe it’s because Frank Chu has seen it all. Ever since the early 90s, he’s been the oddball repository of the city’s activist tradition. When we protested the Iraq War, Frank was there. When we marched for gay marriage, Frank marched … well, maybe not with us, but certainly alongside us. When Obama came to San Francisco, there was Frank, making the Service nervous. Issues come and go, but that crazy black sign with the galactic jargon has marked the time.
So if his reaction to the teabaggers is a yawn, can we blame him? Those old, white, exurban wingnuts may be interesting to us, but are they inherently interesting? We San Franciscans have attended some protests, but a big part of Frank Chu’s bat-shit insanity is that he attends all of them. Every single one. He’s out there pounding the pavement seven days week. Absolutely no one has logged more activist miles than Frank Chu. He sees more rallies, marches and vigils in a month than most Americans will ever see in their entire lifetimes. That gives him a unique vantage point to assess the teabaggers. Another advantage — one that people are less comfortable saying in our wonderland of inclusion — is that he’s barking mad. That’s also a plus because it makes him ideologically indiscriminate. Regardless of what he says, he doesn’t really pick sides, so a right-wing protest holds no novelty for him. He’s not unnerved by veiled talk of political violence because he’s seen George W. Bush burned in effigy. Seen through his sunglasses, how tame the teabaggers must look compared to us. They don’t match our intensity. They don’t even match our production values.
That’s because San Francisco is a political town. Activism in the air. You can’t swing a dead cat without hitting a petition drive. Roving gangs of Shiite cyclists shut down the city once a month. These days, a couple hundred protesters marching down the city’s main boulevard barely bat an eye. Any interest group worth its salt can shut down a public hearing. Not many people know this, but the San Francisco Longshoremen’s Union damn near ignited the American Labor movement right out there on the Embarcadero during the 1930s. Vietnam was never more bitterly fought than in San Francisco. The Stonewall Riot in New York was a milestone, but it was the Castro district where homosexuals gained real political power. Politicking is just a part of who we are. We’re so political, we recycle our picket signs. 

Frank’s right: the teabaggers are amateurs. These bad boys have at least 5 coats. Once the rains let up, it’ll be protest season again. Soon it’ll be time to suit up.
See you out there, Frank.

Last week our local eccentric called the teabaggers amateurs, the inside joke being that, compared to Frank Chu, everyone’s an amateur. Despite the fact that he’s certifiable, he’s also sponsored by a web hosting service. He’s about as close to a professional protester as a person can get.

But the larger joke is that Frank Chu has more in common with the teabaggers than the latter would care to admit. Do a little digging and you’ll find he’s a Republican. Ask what he’s protesting and he’ll spout some paranoid fantasy about U.S. Presidents cheating him out of money. He harbors a particular distaste for corporations. Behind all those linguistically challenged signs lies a fantastic sense of injury.

Sound like anyone else we know? Ahem

All things considered, Frank and the teabaggers are simpatico. He needs the media circus to thrive and he’s nothing if not a publicity-hound. The teabaggers fall squarely in that category. So why the disdain? Where did that uncharacteristically lucid remark come from?

Maybe it’s because Frank Chu has seen it all. Ever since the early 90s, he’s been the oddball repository of the city’s activist tradition. When we protested the Iraq War, Frank was there. When we marched for gay marriage, Frank marched … well, maybe not with us, but certainly alongside us. When Obama came to San Francisco, there was Frank, making the Service nervous. Issues come and go, but that crazy black sign with the galactic jargon has marked the time.

So if his reaction to the teabaggers is a yawn, can we blame him? Those old, white, exurban wingnuts may be interesting to us, but are they inherently interesting? We San Franciscans have attended some protests, but a big part of Frank Chu’s bat-shit insanity is that he attends all of them. Every single one. He’s out there pounding the pavement seven days week. Absolutely no one has logged more activist miles than Frank Chu. He sees more rallies, marches and vigils in a month than most Americans will ever see in their entire lifetimes. That gives him a unique vantage point to assess the teabaggers. Another advantage — one that people are less comfortable saying in our wonderland of inclusion — is that he’s barking mad. That’s also a plus because it makes him ideologically indiscriminate. Regardless of what he says, he doesn’t really pick sides, so a right-wing protest holds no novelty for him. He’s not unnerved by veiled talk of political violence because he’s seen George W. Bush burned in effigy. Seen through his sunglasses, how tame the teabaggers must look compared to us. They don’t match our intensity. They don’t even match our production values.

That’s because San Francisco is a political town. Activism in the air. You can’t swing a dead cat without hitting a petition drive. Roving gangs of Shiite cyclists shut down the city once a month. These days, a couple hundred protesters marching down the city’s main boulevard barely bat an eye. Any interest group worth its salt can shut down a public hearing. Not many people know this, but the San Francisco Longshoremen’s Union damn near ignited the American Labor movement right out there on the Embarcadero during the 1930s. Vietnam was never more bitterly fought than in San Francisco. The Stonewall Riot in New York was a milestone, but it was the Castro district where homosexuals gained real political power. Politicking is just a part of who we are. We’re so political, we recycle our picket signs

Frank’s right: the teabaggers are amateurs. These bad boys have at least 5 coats. Once the rains let up, it’ll be protest season again. Soon it’ll be time to suit up.

See you out there, Frank.

♬ Lollipops and Love ♫ ♬

(via vahl)

The Teabaggers are singing folk songs about San Francisco:

“Unfortunately, the citizens of San Francisco get to vote on her, and apparently they like her. They’ve kept voting her in all these years, to the point where she was up for the speakership. It’s amazing. I think it’s something you’ll see in the history books someday — how one city brought down a nation, by voting Queen Pelosi into office time and again.”

Whoa oh oh
Lollipops and Love

Bill was passed today
Don’t know how we’ll pay
My kids might have something to say

San Francisco 60’s dream
Is our new legal reality
by Queen Pelosi’s Gavel

Whoa oh oh
Lollipops and Love

The taxman collects
OPM will deny
mothers and sons will cry

Not enough doctors
for this socialist scheme
this sugar-high dream

Whoa oh oh
Lollipops and Love

San Francisco is
the city
that brought down
a nation

 So for those keeping score at home:

  • This Land is Your Land
  • We Shall Overcome
  • Yes We Can
  • Lollipops & Love

Good times.

Kicking myself. How many strings were attached, though? How many hoops before the check cleared?

Kicking myself. How many strings were attached, though? How many hoops before the check cleared?

The problem with photoblogging a live event, is that you don’t have time to take pictures, listen to the speeches, talk to people and provide granular or meta-analysis in real time. When they eventually take blogging seriously in J-school, maybe it’ll be a marketable skill. But the problem with photoblogging a Tea Party, in particular, is that a full day later your normal reserves of snark are depleted. I don’t have enough left in the tank to spread between these two reactions to my initial post:

You guys, this is so awesome. The teabaggers are doing this thing they call “astroturfing” where they stand on a patch of AstroTurf and testify to the crowd about their personal stories of… unjust taxation.
They don’t know “astroturfing” is slang for corporate money masquerading as a grass roots movement. Everyone else in the political landscape uses it as shorthand for an elaborate sham.
Good times.

jeffmiller:
Those silly regular-people rubes, and their ignorance of insider Beltway parlance.
generic1:
Characterizing political jargon as “Beltway” is like calling me “Hollywood” because I said the cinematography of the latest movie sucked. This is San Francisco. We know about astroturfing because, admittedly, we are not rubes. We’re very familiar with downtown interests fronting supposedly organic movements. But SF is as far from DC as you can get and still be in the contiguous 48 states. So if these suburban patriots don’t know what the word means, they shouldn’t use it. 
ifightevil:
Umm, I think generic1 and squashed are missing the point.  The whole idea is to mock liberals, and in particular Pelosi, for claiming that their movement is just ‘astroturf’.  See here. (SF Gate liberal enough for you?)  But why would tea partiers know how to make a nuanced riposte like that? They’re so much less educated than liberals!
generic1:

O rly? Let’s see if this parallel works:
There was a now-defunct website on tumblr called Boner Party. It basically objectified hot women. When feminists cried foul, the response was “Hey, it’s satire!" It would then return to … objectifying hot women. I loved it. The regularly scheduled programing was a guilty pleasure, but the tactic was inspired.
"You just don’t ‘get’ it." (Genius!)"You can’t see the subtext because you have an agenda." 
Yet any casual observer would (correctly) infer that Boner Party was all about hot women. It wasn’t a blog about the great personalities of average-looking girls. It’s the same thing with astroturfing and the teabaggers.
If you lay down a piece of AstroTurf at a political rally, and then use it as an ironic symbol to reclaim “grass-roots” legitimacy, then you DAMNwell better not have monied interests stepping on that AstroTurf. If you do, then you’re just validating the original criticism. You’re showing up as advertised. You’re coming full circle and there’s nothing ironic about that. It’s just stupid. 
So who was one of the first speakers on that little green swath of artificial grass? See that guy in the white shirt and the black slacks in front of the yellow flag?
He was extremely well-received by the crowd and here’s why: He offered — I swear to God — $1500 checks to ANY group or organization who would advance Tea Party interests. There was some requirement about “signing a petition.” I’m not making this up. I was right there in front when he said it. He was wearing a red tie.
There was no move to shush him or rush him off the stage. There was no embarrassment from the organizers. He was lustily cheered. And I can totally see why! That’s a lot of money. Only really rich people have that kind of cash to blow on politics. I repeat: One thousand, five hundred dollars. Offering $1500 checks to hundreds of people is a lot of things, but it isn’t freaking populist. That’s well over a month’s salary for a person earning minimum wage. My cost of living is among the highest in the nation, and even I was thinking of which bills I could pay off.
So I was understandably confused. I asked several people around me what was going on. Was the Tea Party in favor of astroturfing? Do you think this guy is a salt-of-the-earth joe, ready to help you walk precincts and put up posters? It was clear no one in my immediate vicinity A) knew what astroturfing was (my original criticism) or B) why it was objectionable. By far the most common response was “This is just something we do at every Tea Party.” The significance was lost; it had passed into ritual.
So saying this is a “nuanced riposte” is ridiculous. When I watch a wealthy man metaphorically dangle his bank account in front of the People of WalMart, I know what I’m seeing. And when it becomes clear that others around me don’t, it’s appropriate to cite ignorance. 
Normal, middle-class American don’t use that kind of money as a carrot to advance their political interests. George Soros is worth billions and he supports drug legalization. If he offered me a $1500 check at a rally, I’d cheer my ass off. But I wouldn’t place him on some AstroTurf and then lecture my political opponents on how they’re “missing the point.” Nancy Pelosi and the rest of us effete, urbane leftists have a cynical word for that kind of political action. It ain’t “grass-roots organizing.”
You can contend he was only a “small” businessman (with thousands to disperse during a massive recession) and that it’s not astroturf unless it’s blatantly deceitful or massively corporate. That’s a legitimate argument. But the attendees genuinely didn’t grasp the significance of the term, and the organizers genuinely didn’t see why the motives of an affluent white guy during Tax Day aren’t especially credible to the rest of us. Rich Uncle Pennybags isn’t going to be working the phonebanks or driving old folks to the polls during Election Day. He’s going to pay the crowd to do it for him.
Chrissakes, one and a half grand? For that dough, I’D advance tea party interests. That was almost the size of my Federal tax return.
Oh … wait.

The problem with photoblogging a live event, is that you don’t have time to take pictures, listen to the speeches, talk to people and provide granular or meta-analysis in real time. When they eventually take blogging seriously in J-school, maybe it’ll be a marketable skill. But the problem with photoblogging a Tea Party, in particular, is that a full day later your normal reserves of snark are depleted. I don’t have enough left in the tank to spread between these two reactions to my initial post:

You guys, this is so awesome. The teabaggers are doing this thing they call “astroturfing” where they stand on a patch of AstroTurf and testify to the crowd about their personal stories of… unjust taxation.

They don’t know “astroturfing” is slang for corporate money masquerading as a grass roots movement. Everyone else in the political landscape uses it as shorthand for an elaborate sham.

Good times.

jeffmiller:

Those silly regular-people rubes, and their ignorance of insider Beltway parlance.

generic1:

Characterizing political jargon as “Beltway” is like calling me “Hollywood” because I said the cinematography of the latest movie sucked. This is San Francisco. We know about astroturfing because, admittedly, we are not rubes. We’re very familiar with downtown interests fronting supposedly organic movements. But SF is as far from DC as you can get and still be in the contiguous 48 states. So if these suburban patriots don’t know what the word means, they shouldn’t use it. 

ifightevil:

Umm, I think generic1 and squashed are missing the point.  The whole idea is to mock liberals, and in particular Pelosi, for claiming that their movement is just ‘astroturf’.  See here. (SF Gate liberal enough for you?)  But why would tea partiers know how to make a nuanced riposte like that? They’re so much less educated than liberals!

generic1:

O rly? Let’s see if this parallel works:

There was a now-defunct website on tumblr called Boner Party. It basically objectified hot women. When feminists cried foul, the response was “Hey, it’s satire!" It would then return to … objectifying hot women. I loved it. The regularly scheduled programing was a guilty pleasure, but the tactic was inspired.

"You just don’t ‘get’ it." (Genius!)"You can’t see the subtext because you have an agenda.

Yet any casual observer would (correctly) infer that Boner Party was all about hot women. It wasn’t a blog about the great personalities of average-looking girls. It’s the same thing with astroturfing and the teabaggers.

If you lay down a piece of AstroTurf at a political rally, and then use it as an ironic symbol to reclaim “grass-roots” legitimacy, then you DAMNwell better not have monied interests stepping on that AstroTurf. If you do, then you’re just validating the original criticism. You’re showing up as advertised. You’re coming full circle and there’s nothing ironic about that. It’s just stupid. 

So who was one of the first speakers on that little green swath of artificial grass? See that guy in the white shirt and the black slacks in front of the yellow flag?

He was extremely well-received by the crowd and here’s why: He offered — I swear to God — $1500 checks to ANY group or organization who would advance Tea Party interests. There was some requirement about “signing a petition.” I’m not making this up. I was right there in front when he said it. He was wearing a red tie.

There was no move to shush him or rush him off the stage. There was no embarrassment from the organizers. He was lustily cheered. And I can totally see why! That’s a lot of money. Only really rich people have that kind of cash to blow on politics. I repeat: One thousand, five hundred dollars. Offering $1500 checks to hundreds of people is a lot of things, but it isn’t freaking populist. That’s well over a month’s salary for a person earning minimum wage. My cost of living is among the highest in the nation, and even I was thinking of which bills I could pay off.

So I was understandably confused. I asked several people around me what was going on. Was the Tea Party in favor of astroturfing? Do you think this guy is a salt-of-the-earth joe, ready to help you walk precincts and put up posters? It was clear no one in my immediate vicinity A) knew what astroturfing was (my original criticism) or B) why it was objectionable. By far the most common response was “This is just something we do at every Tea Party.” The significance was lost; it had passed into ritual.

So saying this is a “nuanced riposte” is ridiculous. When I watch a wealthy man metaphorically dangle his bank account in front of the People of WalMart, I know what I’m seeing. And when it becomes clear that others around me don’t, it’s appropriate to cite ignorance. 

Normal, middle-class American don’t use that kind of money as a carrot to advance their political interests. George Soros is worth billions and he supports drug legalization. If he offered me a $1500 check at a rally, I’d cheer my ass off. But I wouldn’t place him on some AstroTurf and then lecture my political opponents on how they’re “missing the point.” Nancy Pelosi and the rest of us effete, urbane leftists have a cynical word for that kind of political action. It ain’t “grass-roots organizing.”

You can contend he was only a “small” businessman (with thousands to disperse during a massive recession) and that it’s not astroturf unless it’s blatantly deceitful or massively corporate. That’s a legitimate argument. But the attendees genuinely didn’t grasp the significance of the term, and the organizers genuinely didn’t see why the motives of an affluent white guy during Tax Day aren’t especially credible to the rest of us. Rich Uncle Pennybags isn’t going to be working the phonebanks or driving old folks to the polls during Election Day. He’s going to pay the crowd to do it for him.

Chrissakes, one and a half grand? For that dough, I’D advance tea party interests. That was almost the size of my Federal tax return.

Oh … wait.

Well, a good time was had by all. Time to pack it in.
Teabaggers, I raise my liberal latte to you. Way to journey into the heart of the beast. I offer this toast:
"White Power!"

Well, a good time was had by all. Time to pack it in.

Teabaggers, I raise my liberal latte to you. Way to journey into the heart of the beast. I offer this toast:

"White Power!"

Bob: Listen, Earl we gotta talk.
Earl: Lock & load!
Bob: You need to fix your Tea Party sign.
Earl: What’s wrong with it?
Bob: It’s not spelled right.
Earl: What? How?
Bob: That’s not how Barack is spelled.
Earl: So?
Bob: Hussein is spelled with an “e”, then an “i”.
Earl: Who cares how a muslim spells his name?
Bob: Fair point. But you gotta fix “hazardous” too.
Earl: What are you, some kind of schoolteacher?

Bob: Listen, Earl we gotta talk.

Earl: Lock & load!

Bob: You need to fix your Tea Party sign.

Earl: What’s wrong with it?

Bob: It’s not spelled right.

Earl: What? How?

Bob: That’s not how Barack is spelled.

Earl: So?

Bob: Hussein is spelled with an “e”, then an “i”.

Earl: Who cares how a muslim spells his name?

Bob: Fair point. But you gotta fix “hazardous” too.

Earl: What are you, some kind of schoolteacher?

Mao has taken Australia, Castro has taken South America, and Zombie Lenin sits astride a throne in Buckingham Palace made from the skulls of small businessmen.

Mao has taken Australia, Castro has taken South America, and Zombie Lenin sits astride a throne in Buckingham Palace made from the skulls of small businessmen.