Unbranded; without a registered trademark.

 

newsweek:

When a smartphone user opens Angry Birds, the popular game application, and starts slinging birds at chortling green pigs, spy agencies have plotted how to lurk in the background to snatch data revealing the player’s location, age, sex and other personal information, according to secret British intelligence documents.
In their globe-spanning surveillance for terrorism suspects and other targets, the National Security Agency and its British counterpart have been trying to exploit a basic byproduct of modern telecommunications: With each new generation of mobile phone technology, ever greater amounts of personal data pour onto networks where spies can pick it up.
According to dozens of previously undisclosed classified documents, among the most valuable of those unintended intelligence tools are so-called leaky apps that spew everything from users’ smartphone identification codes to where they have been that day.
The N.S.A. and Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters were working together on how to collect and store data from dozens of smartphone apps by 2007, according to the documents, provided by Edward J. Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor.
Since then, the agencies have traded recipes for grabbing location and planning data when a target uses Google Maps, and for vacuuming up address books, buddy lists, phone logs and the geographic data embedded in photos when someone sends a post to the mobile versions of Facebook, Flickr, LinkedIn, Twitter and other services.

newsweek:

When a smartphone user opens Angry Birds, the popular game application, and starts slinging birds at chortling green pigs, spy agencies have plotted how to lurk in the background to snatch data revealing the player’s location, age, sex and other personal information, according to secret British intelligence documents.

In their globe-spanning surveillance for terrorism suspects and other targets, the National Security Agency and its British counterpart have been trying to exploit a basic byproduct of modern telecommunications: With each new generation of mobile phone technology, ever greater amounts of personal data pour onto networks where spies can pick it up.

According to dozens of previously undisclosed classified documents, among the most valuable of those unintended intelligence tools are so-called leaky apps that spew everything from users’ smartphone identification codes to where they have been that day.

The N.S.A. and Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters were working together on how to collect and store data from dozens of smartphone apps by 2007, according to the documents, provided by Edward J. Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor.

Since then, the agencies have traded recipes for grabbing location and planning data when a target uses Google Maps, and for vacuuming up address books, buddy lists, phone logs and the geographic data embedded in photos when someone sends a post to the mobile versions of Facebook, Flickr, LinkedIn, Twitter and other services.

"People who actually work in the city, and I’m talking about normal people, like teachers and policeman and firemen and city workers and shop-owners—they can’t live here. 
They can’t live here because this place has been overrun by crazy money that’s being tossed around like sacks of bananas to people who are ‘solving’ shit that doesn’t solve any real problem for any real human being, except coming up with shit like $150 smoke detectors for rich people. And it’s turned what used to be a fucking magnificent city into a bedroom community for the Peninsula.”
—Mike Monteiro

"People who actually work in the city, and I’m talking about normal people, like teachers and policeman and firemen and city workers and shop-ownersthey can’t live here

They can’t live here because this place has been overrun by crazy money that’s being tossed around like sacks of bananas to people who are ‘solving’ shit that doesn’t solve any real problem for any real human being, except coming up with shit like $150 smoke detectors for rich people. And it’s turned what used to be a fucking magnificent city into a bedroom community for the Peninsula.”

Mike Monteiro

I, Glasshole:

People get angry at Glass. They get angry at you for wearing Glass. They talk about you openly. It inspires the most aggressive of passive aggression. Bill Wasik refers apologetically to the Bluedouche principle. But nobody apologizes in real life. They just call you an asshole.
Wearing Glass separates you. It sets you apart from everyone else. It says you not only had $1,500 to plunk down to be part of the “explorer” program, but that Google deemed you special enough to warrant inclusion (not everyone who wanted Glass got it; you had to be selected). Glass is a class divide on your face.

I, Glasshole:

People get angry at Glass. They get angry at you for wearing Glass. They talk about you openly. It inspires the most aggressive of passive aggression. Bill Wasik refers apologetically to the Bluedouche principle. But nobody apologizes in real life. They just call you an asshole.

Wearing Glass separates you. It sets you apart from everyone else. It says you not only had $1,500 to plunk down to be part of the “explorer” program, but that Google deemed you special enough to warrant inclusion (not everyone who wanted Glass got it; you had to be selected). Glass is a class divide on your face.

stryker:

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stop
now make that blogging platform monetized

stryker:

ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads ads

stop

now make that blogging platform monetized

"I have a foreboding of an America in my children’s or grandchildren’s time — when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers are in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what’s true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness…"
-Carl Sagan, who saw it all coming.

"I have a foreboding of an America in my children’s or grandchildren’s time — when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers are in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what’s true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness…"

-Carl Sagan, who saw it all coming.

Google Glass techie ejected from hipster hotspot

seoulbrother:

So far the best use for Google Glass is getting yourself ostracized.

>Seattle entrepreneur Dave Meinert named The Five Point Cafe a Google Glass Free zone before the devices were even available. But a Glass wearing customer was asking for an explanation — and, potentially, to have an employee fired — when he was told earlier this week he couldn’t use the wearable computer in one of Meinert’s newer businesses, the 24-hour Lost Lake Cafe and Lounge.

webuiltthiscity:

I really wanted to buy this but just couldn’t stomach paying 25 bucks for a canvas bag. At the new Whole Foods.

Shit is getting absurd in this town.

webuiltthiscity:

I really wanted to buy this but just couldn’t stomach paying 25 bucks for a canvas bag. At the new Whole Foods.

Shit is getting absurd in this town.