Unbranded; without a registered trademark.

 

authenticity

rendit:

Far from the flashy softcore pornography of Mad Men or Boardwalk Empire or the tongue that fails to hit the cheek cartoonishness of 30 Rock or Girls, Everybody Loves Raymond is a keening, gurgling representation of what it’s like to live surrounded by the wreckage of capitalism. Nothing ever happens. No one ever changes. Everyone is always fighting over nothing. There are no stakes; how could there be any? What would they be? I’ve watched about three quarters of two episodes and I never want to watch any more. Because it’s too real. 

wolfmasters:

breaking bad meme: [2/5] characters
↳ gustavo fring 

“I hide in plain sight, same as you.”

Breaking Bad, for me, was about the contours of the villiany. Not anti-heros, not antagonists, but straight-up, old-fashioned Bad People Doing Bad Things.

They start you off with the absurd Tuco Salamanca and double-down with the Cousins. Fring is the crescendo. You think it’s peaked there. And in a way it has.

But then comes Todd.

wikipedia:

Tureaud next worked as a bouncer. It was at this time that he created the persona of Mr. T. His wearing of gold neck chains and other jewelry was the result of customers losing the items or leaving them behind at the night club after a fight. A customer, who may have been banned from the club or trying to avoid another confrontation, would not have to re-enter the club if Mr. T wore their jewelry as he stood out front. When a customer returned to claim the item, it was readily visible and available with no further confrontation required. Along with controlling the violence as a doorman, Tureaud was mainly hired to keep out drug dealers and users. During his bouncing days, Tureaud was in over 200 fights and was sued a number of times, but won each case. 

wikipedia:

Tureaud next worked as a bouncer. It was at this time that he created the persona of Mr. T. His wearing of gold neck chains and other jewelry was the result of customers losing the items or leaving them behind at the night club after a fight. A customer, who may have been banned from the club or trying to avoid another confrontation, would not have to re-enter the club if Mr. T wore their jewelry as he stood out front. When a customer returned to claim the item, it was readily visible and available with no further confrontation required. Along with controlling the violence as a doorman, Tureaud was mainly hired to keep out drug dealers and users. During his bouncing days, Tureaud was in over 200 fights and was sued a number of times, but won each case. 

The shot heard ‘round the [television] world

image

jfriedman:

And that’s why the fact that it comes from Netflix is such a big deal. Watching House of Cards is great for the content, but because of the delivery method. This is the first truly great television show in history not to require a cable subscription. Not only that, but the show is available instantly, on your time, wherever/whenever. That’s the shot heard ‘round the world. It’s Netflix not only taking on the networks, but taking on the cable companies. It’s disrupting an entire industry.

The war has started for the future of television and Netflix, not directly, is fighting the good fight. If we, the consumers, can purchase the rights to watch the best shows directly, why we would pay a middle-man (cable companies) to do the same thing for us, for a more expensive? That’s the vision of the future that Netflix is presenting and House of Cards verifies its legitimacy …

“The goal is to become HBO faster than HBO can become us” was the big quote from Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos from an in-depth feature on the company in GQ.


“Some influence had come into his life that he’d embraced and it didn’t seem to be… of the popular vote.”
-Charlie Sheen on the subject of his former co-star, Angus T. Jones.

Priceless phrase.

“Some influence had come into his life that he’d embraced and it didn’t seem to be… of the popular vote.”

-Charlie Sheen on the subject of his former co-star, Angus T. Jones.

Priceless phrase.

California Broadcasting Legend Huell Howser Dead At 67


Q: I heard somewhere that you want to die on the air …
A: I want it to happen at the end of a show. I’m saying my goodbyes to everyone and then suddenly I clutch my heart and fall over. The credits roll as the dust covers me and everyone at home says, ‘Well, Huell had a good run but I think that’s his last episode.’ … I want to be cremated. I’ve made a list of my favorite 20 places in California, and it’s going to be a two-week vacation where [my sister and her husband] come to California and get my urn full of ashes and go to these 20 places, staying in the best hotels, eating at the finest restaurants, and at each place they leave a piece of Huell. I’ve got it exactly mapped out.

California Broadcasting Legend Huell Howser Dead At 67

Q: I heard somewhere that you want to die on the air …

A: I want it to happen at the end of a show. I’m saying my goodbyes to everyone and then suddenly I clutch my heart and fall over. The credits roll as the dust covers me and everyone at home says, ‘Well, Huell had a good run but I think that’s his last episode.’ … I want to be cremated. I’ve made a list of my favorite 20 places in California, and it’s going to be a two-week vacation where [my sister and her husband] come to California and get my urn full of ashes and go to these 20 places, staying in the best hotels, eating at the finest restaurants, and at each place they leave a piece of Huell. I’ve got it exactly mapped out.

I did watch Lost. I watched Lost in it’s entire run and I was, I was fascinated, but you know, even as early as the second season and certainly the third season, I started saying, how the hell are they going to pull all of this together? If they pull all of this together, it’s going to be the greatest show in the history of television, man. They better know how to pull all of this together. And then when I reached the end and they hadn’t pulled it altogether, in fact, they left a big turd on my doorstep? I was pretty upset, you know.

I’m halfway through the final season of The Wire and the full Euripidean weight of the series is making it impossible for me to watch the final 5 episodes.
I’m missing the old Omar — the one who added touch of levity to the inevitable pain and death of West Baltimore.
"Indeed."
"Do tell."
Has anyone made the connection to Val Kilmer’s Doc Holiday in Tombstone?

I’m halfway through the final season of The Wire and the full Euripidean weight of the series is making it impossible for me to watch the final 5 episodes.

I’m missing the old Omar — the one who added touch of levity to the inevitable pain and death of West Baltimore.

"Indeed."

"Do tell."

Has anyone made the connection to Val Kilmer’s Doc Holiday in Tombstone?

Jim Rome controversy:

… Everett was reportedly “shellshocked” from the numerous times he was sacked and hit in the NFC Championship Game against the San Francisco 49ers … At one point in the game, Everett was so rattled that he collapsed to the ground in the pocket in anticipation of yet another sack, even though the 49ers’ defensive players actually had not yet reached him – a play now known as Everett’s “Phantom Sack”.

From then on he was perceived to shy away from hits, and later acknowledged that his confidence was never fully restored.

This eventually led to a confrontation in 1994 with then Talk2 host Jim Rome. Rome had regularly mocked Everett’s aversion to taking hits on the field by addressing him as “Chris” Everett (a reference to female tennis player Chris Evert). When Everett appeared as a guest on Talk2, Rome wasted no time, applying the insult twice within the show’s first 30 seconds. Everett warned Rome not to do so again, implying that physical confrontation would ensue otherwise. When Rome did, Everett overturned the table between them and shoved Rome to the floor while still on the air.