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Original Sin: Why the GOP is and will continue to be the party of white people

It is not a coincidence that the resurgence of nullification is happening while our first African American president is in office …
We are left with the profound historical irony that the party of Lincoln—of the Gettysburg Address, with its reiteration of the Declaration’s assertion of equality and its vision of a “new birth of freedom”—has found sustenance in Lincoln’s principal intellectual and moral antagonist.
It has become the party of Calhoun.

Original Sin: Why the GOP is and will continue to be the party of white people

It is not a coincidence that the resurgence of nullification is happening while our first African American president is in office …

We are left with the profound historical irony that the party of Lincoln—of the Gettysburg Address, with its reiteration of the Declaration’s assertion of equality and its vision of a “new birth of freedom”—has found sustenance in Lincoln’s principal intellectual and moral antagonist.

It has become the party of Calhoun.

North Carolina Schools May Cut Chunk Out of U.S. History Lessons | History News Network

think4yourself:

FOX News (2-3-10) He may be the president who governed during the Civil War, freeing the slaves, but under a new curriculum proposal for North Carolina high schools, U.S. history would begin years after President Lincoln, with the presidency of Rutherford B. Hayes in 1877….

generic1:

I’m shocked, shocked, shocked the South is revising the Civil War in 2010. (And yes, erasure is revision.)

bowlingalleylawyer:

if you read this and got that them thar hicks in tuh South is revising thuh Civil War! SHOUTY SHOUTY! then I am pretty sure you need to go back to high school.

generic1:

Is “SHOUTY SHOUTY” Southern slang for something? Because I only speak Standard English. Though if I did re-enroll for a high school education, I better not wait and I better not do it in North Carolina, because I wouldn’t get one.

Let’s read on:

FOX News:

Under the proposed change, the ninth-graders would take a course called global studies, focusing in part on issues such as the environment. The 10th grade still would study civics and economics, but 11th-graders would take U.S. history only from 1877 onward….
"The answer isn’t to throw out fundamental portions of U.S. history," said Mike Belter, a U.S. history teacher and social studies director. "This is not preparing our kids to have a deep historical perspective that can be used to analyze modern events for themselves."…

generic1:

It’s absolutely precious how selective they’re being here. It’s not merely the Civil war, it’s Reconstruction too. 1877 is historically irrelevant, but 1878 makes the cut. Robber-barons are crucially important, but the 14th Amendment is trifling stuff. It’s like some lefty school boarder thought he could horsetrade on climate change or genocide by keeping slavery in the 7th grade. But an unreconstructed Southerner like Bowlingalleylawyer can’t address any of that. Erasure-as-revision flies over her head.

This woman has a law degree. Shouty shouty.

North Carolina Schools May Cut Chunk Out of U.S. History Lessons | History News Network

think4yourself:

SOURCE: FOX News (2-3-10)
He may be the president who governed during the Civil War, freeing the slaves, but under a new curriculum proposal for North Carolina high schools, U.S. history would begin years after President Lincoln, with the presidency of Rutherford B. Hayes in 1877….

I’m shocked, shocked, shocked the South is revising the Civil War in 2010. (And yes, erasure is revision.)

And The South Will Rise Again

Periqueblend points us to this chilling photo essay in Mother Jones.

I find myself wondering which color I’d choose. The red satin looks a little Catholic Cardinal for my taste. (I almost said “too tacky”. Ha!) And although the grey version is an appropriate nod to the Confederacy, I’d probably go with iconic white. Please note the harmless symbol of southern heritage on the arms.

___________________________________________________________

Aryan Outfitters

Meet the KKK’s seamstress of hate couture. Photo Essay by Anthony Karen

Ms. Ruth is a 57-year-old tailor who lives in the Deep South. She makes ceremonial Ku Klux Klan robes and comes from five generations of the Klan. This is pre-cut cardboard outline for one of her Ku Klux Klan hoods.

Ms. Ruth at her work station at home, sitting in front of her computer and a sewing machine.

The beginning stages of a new hood in white, a traditional Klan robe color.

Ms. Ruth personally sews one robe a day. She works 10 to 12 hours a day, seven days a week. She has 1 to 3 helpers at times. The person to be fitted measures themselves, fills out the tailoring chart, and mails in the order. It takes 4 to 6 weeks for delivery. Here she puts the final touches on a red Klan hood.

A Louisiana Ku Klux Klan patch on one of Ms. Ruth’s new white robes. Ms. Ruth works in the background.

Ms. Ruth changes her daughter’s IV fluids. “They said she wouldn’t live for more than three months. I refused to leave her in the hospital, so I took her home.” Caring for her daughter Lilbit is a full time job. Ms. Ruth rarely leaves the house; she spends most of her time sewing and taking care of her daughter and her animals.

Ms. Ruth’s husband has just returned from the Sunday flea market, where he rents a booth to sell white pride merchandise. Ms. Ruth fills him in on the events of the day, including the temporary escape of several pets.

There aren’t many people making traditional ceremonial Klan robes these days. As far as quality is concerned, Ms. Ruth stands alone. All of her robes and hoods are custom made by hand.

Sue (right), checks the fit of a red satin robe made for an Exalted Cyclops of the KKK, while Ms. Ruth takes a cigarette break in the background.

The traditional Klan robe is white, although over time, many groups have adopted their own color system. Robes may also have stripes. They can be any color, depending on the group and its policies. Robes come in satin or cotton. Good quality custom cotton robes sell for $105 to $115; satin robes cost between $110 and $140.

Ms. Ruth blesses each robe before sending them off. Here, she is holding a new, red satin robe against her chest as she blesses it.

Ms. Ruth holds a new robe close to her as she blesses it before sending the robe off to the customer.

Ms. Ruth folds a newly completed gray robe. After it is blessed, the robe will be shipped directly to the customer.

In the middle of preparing dinner for her family, Ms. Ruth gets interrupted by a phone call requesting information on the various ceremonial robe colors. Between phone calls, sewing, and caring for her daughter and all of her animals, it’s “Just another day at the zoo,” she says. A picture of Nathan Bedford Forrest, one of the founders of the KKK, is displayed in the living room just outside the kitchen.

A young child wears a new white Klan robe made by Ms. Ruth.

continued from this thread:
bthny:
1) Do people really consider Texas to be part of the South?
generic1:
Yes.
bthny:
Am I wrong here? I could be wrong. I’ve been wrong before!
generic1:
Yes, You are, and You are in this instance, too.
bthny:
I don’t care if it was part of the Confederate States of America,
generic1:
Oh goody. Because it’s not like that was major point of discussion.
bthny:
I think that it is more of its own special little region than anything
generic1:
That region, culturally and politically, is called “the South”.
bthny:
- but I’ve also never been there, so I could be making assumptions that aren’t based on any kind of facts (dangerous, I know).
generic1:
And how.
bthny:
2) I’ve seen Confederate flags at the Jersey Shore, and while they may be more prevalent in the South, I think it’s as much of a rural/redneck thing as a Southern thing at this point.
generic1:
We have rednecks in Oregon. No so many instances of the pro-Slavery symbolism, though.
bthny:
(I honestly have no idea why else that shit would be sold in New Jersey.) Also, I believe that you are overstating the number of current state flags that use it.
generic1:
Did I state a number? Reread.
bthny:
Georgia’s did as recently as 2003, but I believe the only state flag that still has it is Mississippi. I’m not sure how many states still display the flag at their capitol buildings but I really don’t think it’s very common anymore because every time it happens there is a pretty large public outcry.
generic1:
That’s your argument? That we’re almost up to speed? in 2003? Have you seen the resistance in the face of that outcry? Do you know what it took to purge those statehouses of that symbolism? Stare real hard at Georgia’s flag. Then Alabama’s. Then Florida’s. Then Arkanasas’. Then Tennessee’s. You’ll notice a theme.
bthny:
3) Racism itself, in all forms and at all levels, is just as present outside of the South. In fact, I feel that I have experienced more outright vocal racism in Pennsylvania than I ever did in Georgia.
generic1:
The plural of anecdote is not data.
bthny:
Anyone who thinks that the South is the center/source/whatever of all racism in this country needs to travel a little bit.
generic1:
Or just look at the data.
bthny:
Also: Sarah Palin is not Southern. Orly Taitz is not Southern. Glenn Beck is not Southern. Sean Hannity is not Southern.
generic1:
No. But in which media markets do those names get the most support?
bthny:
5) In conclusion, fuck all y’all who seriously think that people in the South are still fighting the Civil War.
generic1:
Yeah, I’ll be sure and lay a wreath at the MLK memorial in your name. Look, respond to the substance of the post, not with personal statements of your own subjective experience. Look at the cartoon. Look at this graph. Fact: Birthers are big in the South. Now, why would that be?

continued from this thread:

bthny:

1) Do people really consider Texas to be part of the South?

generic1:

Yes.

bthny:

Am I wrong here? I could be wrong. I’ve been wrong before!

generic1:

Yes, You are, and You are in this instance, too.

bthny:

I don’t care if it was part of the Confederate States of America,

generic1:

Oh goody. Because it’s not like that was major point of discussion.

bthny:

I think that it is more of its own special little region than anything

generic1:

That region, culturally and politically, is called “the South”.

bthny:

- but I’ve also never been there, so I could be making assumptions that aren’t based on any kind of facts (dangerous, I know).

generic1:

And how.

bthny:

2) I’ve seen Confederate flags at the Jersey Shore, and while they may be more prevalent in the South, I think it’s as much of a rural/redneck thing as a Southern thing at this point.

generic1:

We have rednecks in Oregon. No so many instances of the pro-Slavery symbolism, though.

bthny:

(I honestly have no idea why else that shit would be sold in New Jersey.) Also, I believe that you are overstating the number of current state flags that use it.

generic1:

Did I state a number? Reread.

bthny:

Georgia’s did as recently as 2003, but I believe the only state flag that still has it is Mississippi. I’m not sure how many states still display the flag at their capitol buildings but I really don’t think it’s very common anymore because every time it happens there is a pretty large public outcry.

generic1:

That’s your argument? That we’re almost up to speed? in 2003? Have you seen the resistance in the face of that outcry? Do you know what it took to purge those statehouses of that symbolism? Stare real hard at Georgia’s flag. Then Alabama’s. Then Florida’s. Then Arkanasas’. Then Tennessee’s. You’ll notice a theme.

bthny:

3) Racism itself, in all forms and at all levels, is just as present outside of the South. In fact, I feel that I have experienced more outright vocal racism in Pennsylvania than I ever did in Georgia.

generic1:

The plural of anecdote is not data.

bthny:

Anyone who thinks that the South is the center/source/whatever of all racism in this country needs to travel a little bit.

generic1:

Or just look at the data.

bthny:

Also: Sarah Palin is not Southern. Orly Taitz is not Southern. Glenn Beck is not Southern. Sean Hannity is not Southern.

generic1:

No. But in which media markets do those names get the most support?

bthny:

5) In conclusion, fuck all y’all who seriously think that people in the South are still fighting the Civil War.

generic1:

Yeah, I’ll be sure and lay a wreath at the MLK memorial in your name. Look, respond to the substance of the post, not with personal statements of your own subjective experience. Look at the cartoon. Look at this graph. Fact: Birthers are big in the South. Now, why would that be?
brooklynmutt: Seattle Post-Intelligencer: David Horsey
hoypolloy:

mm. ok. i take offense to this. there are plenty of conservative nut jobs in the rest of the U.S. demanding the same thing. this just continues unfair stereotypes of the South.

generic1:

It’s not unfair at all. The stereotypes exist because they reinforce a basic truth: the South is still fighting the Civil War.
The governor of Texas is talking about secession. Not in 1859, but in 2009. Tenured professors from accredited universities are actually holding conferences discussing the possibility of withdrawing from the union. Right now. Today.
The Confederate flag, which is quite literally a symbol of treason, is proudly displayed in a number of state flags and capitols, to say nothing of its cultural prevalence.
Xenophobia runs wild, in measurable disproportion to the rest of the country. The teabaggers, the birthers … what, you think these guys are based out of Seattle?
Sure, there are sectors of wingnuttery outside of the South. I would point to the White Pride movement in Montana and Idaho, or the nativism in Bakersfield or Orange County, also the religious fundamentalism in Utah and parts of Colorado. But none of them rival the sheer size and concentration of the South.
We have data. If you’re offended, get them to stop doing the offensive stuff. It didn’t work for Lincoln. Eisenhower had to send in the 101st Airborne. Maybe you’ll have better luck.

ericrobertsswagger:

size?  absolutely.  concentration?  i don’t know, the South is huge.

generic1:

By concentration, I mean the South as a region as compared to other concentrated regions. I am referring the wingnut ratio below the Mason-Dixon line, as opposed to above it, and to the west. I’ll concede the Intolerance Belt is huge. It was a huge war.

ericrobertsswagger:

neoconfederates are a hate group, no doubt about it.  but describing the South as a whole as hateful is neither constructive nor accurate.

generic1:

I’m not tarring each and every individual Southerner with one brush. But I am tarring Southern popular and political culture, yes. This point gets repeated about 10 times in the following threads, so let’s nail it down. You’re assuming a  division fallacy. You’re responding to an argument I’m not making— that because something’s true of a thing, it must also be true of all or some of its parts.
The South is a hotbed of intolerance.
The South is made up of Southerners.
Therefore, all Southerners are intolerant.
Not my argument. I said “the South is still fighting the Civil War.” Not that they’re literally charging with bayonets at Gettysburg (though they are, which is totally creepy and buttresses my point) but that they haven’t moved beyond the socio-political problems which gave rise to the Civil War. And when you mix that in with the religious fundamentalism, you get that distinctively Southern flavor. I gave some hard examples of how it’s manifested in recent political movements:

ericrobertsswagger:

gov. perry and the teabaggers may have said some ridiculous shit about secession, but houston (i.e. america’s 4th largest city) also just elected an openly gay mayor.  point is there are counterexamples for every wingnut.

generic1:

Yeah, but you don’t have enough counterexamples. For every gay mayor, there are thousands of this guy, who will win re-election not in spite of, but because of this kind of rhetoric. Houston’s mayor is notable because she’s the exception, not the rule. We’re talking about it because it’s a Man Bites Dog story. It’s the South playing against type.

ericrobertsswagger:

i’ve now lived in 2 different cities (lexington, ky and austin, tx) that i consider liberal oases in conservative, largely rural areas.  and yes, looking at a map of the landmass like the one above, most of the area is very conservative and often bigoted.

generic1:

The existence of oases in urban centers doesn’t mitigate my point, in the same way Orange County and Bakersfield doesn’t mitigate the liberalism of California. Houston doesn’t compensate for Texas as a whole. It’s a red, red, red state.

ericrobertsswagger:

and i agree, those who are seem to be pretty pathological about it.  but don’t discount the sheer number of people in the South who are simultaneously proud Rednecks and bleeding hearts.

generic1:

When we’re speaking in broad regional generalities, it’s entirely appropriate to discount the very, very few “proud Rednecks and bleeding hearts.” Last time I checked, Molly Ivins was still dead. You can count the rest of us down there on two hands.

ericrobertsswagger:

i just think writing off rural america as stupid bigots really does us all a disservice.

generic1:

Oh I agree. And if you can find the text where I write that, I’ll concede the point. But rural America is not synonymous with the South. Vermont is provincial as fuck.

ericrobertsswagger:

hate crimes happen in seattle too.

generic1:

Like I said, we’re not talking about individual instances, we’re talking about the aggregate. You show me Seattle’s equivalent of the Southern Poverty Law Center and we’ll compare caseloads. And yeah, yeah, Snow Falling On Cedars, etc. But the Pacific Northwest has nowhere near the same levels of institutionalized racism. Seattle didn’t have Jim Crow laws in 1963. Also: evolution? Big hit in Seattle.

brooklynmuttSeattle Post-Intelligencer: David Horsey

hoypolloy:

mm. ok. i take offense to this. there are plenty of conservative nut jobs in the rest of the U.S. demanding the same thing. this just continues unfair stereotypes of the South.

generic1:

It’s not unfair at all. The stereotypes exist because they reinforce a basic truth: the South is still fighting the Civil War.

The governor of Texas is talking about secession. Not in 1859, but in 2009. Tenured professors from accredited universities are actually holding conferences discussing the possibility of withdrawing from the union. Right now. Today.

The Confederate flag, which is quite literally a symbol of treason, is proudly displayed in a number of state flags and capitols, to say nothing of its cultural prevalence.

Xenophobia runs wild, in measurable disproportion to the rest of the country. The teabaggers, the birthers … what, you think these guys are based out of Seattle?

Sure, there are sectors of wingnuttery outside of the South. I would point to the White Pride movement in Montana and Idaho, or the nativism in Bakersfield or Orange County, also the religious fundamentalism in Utah and parts of Colorado. But none of them rival the sheer size and concentration of the South.

We have data. If you’re offended, get them to stop doing the offensive stuff. It didn’t work for Lincoln. Eisenhower had to send in the 101st Airborne. Maybe you’ll have better luck.

ericrobertsswagger:

size?  absolutely.  concentration?  i don’t know, the South is huge.

generic1:

By concentration, I mean the South as a region as compared to other concentrated regions. I am referring the wingnut ratio below the Mason-Dixon line, as opposed to above it, and to the west. I’ll concede the Intolerance Belt is huge. It was a huge war.

ericrobertsswagger:

neoconfederates are a hate group, no doubt about it.  but describing the South as a whole as hateful is neither constructive nor accurate.

generic1:

I’m not tarring each and every individual Southerner with one brush. But I am tarring Southern popular and political culture, yes. This point gets repeated about 10 times in the following threads, so let’s nail it down. You’re assuming a  division fallacy. You’re responding to an argument I’m not making— that because something’s true of a thing, it must also be true of all or some of its parts.

  1. The South is a hotbed of intolerance.
  2. The South is made up of Southerners.
  3. Therefore, all Southerners are intolerant.

Not my argument. I said “the South is still fighting the Civil War.” Not that they’re literally charging with bayonets at Gettysburg (though they are, which is totally creepy and buttresses my point) but that they haven’t moved beyond the socio-political problems which gave rise to the Civil War. And when you mix that in with the religious fundamentalism, you get that distinctively Southern flavor. I gave some hard examples of how it’s manifested in recent political movements:

ericrobertsswagger:

gov. perry and the teabaggers may have said some ridiculous shit about secession, but houston (i.e. america’s 4th largest city) also just elected an openly gay mayor.  point is there are counterexamples for every wingnut.

generic1:

Yeah, but you don’t have enough counterexamples. For every gay mayor, there are thousands of this guy, who will win re-election not in spite of, but because of this kind of rhetoric. Houston’s mayor is notable because she’s the exception, not the rule. We’re talking about it because it’s a Man Bites Dog story. It’s the South playing against type.

ericrobertsswagger:

i’ve now lived in 2 different cities (lexington, ky and austin, tx) that i consider liberal oases in conservative, largely rural areas.  and yes, looking at a map of the landmass like the one above, most of the area is very conservative and often bigoted.

generic1:

The existence of oases in urban centers doesn’t mitigate my point, in the same way Orange County and Bakersfield doesn’t mitigate the liberalism of California. Houston doesn’t compensate for Texas as a whole. It’s a red, red, red state.

ericrobertsswagger:

and i agree, those who are seem to be pretty pathological about it.  but don’t discount the sheer number of people in the South who are simultaneously proud Rednecks and bleeding hearts.

generic1:

When we’re speaking in broad regional generalities, it’s entirely appropriate to discount the very, very few “proud Rednecks and bleeding hearts.” Last time I checked, Molly Ivins was still dead. You can count the rest of us down there on two hands.

ericrobertsswagger:

i just think writing off rural america as stupid bigots really does us all a disservice.

generic1:

Oh I agree. And if you can find the text where I write that, I’ll concede the point. But rural America is not synonymous with the South. Vermont is provincial as fuck.

ericrobertsswagger:

hate crimes happen in seattle too.

generic1:

Like I said, we’re not talking about individual instances, we’re talking about the aggregate. You show me Seattle’s equivalent of the Southern Poverty Law Center and we’ll compare caseloads. And yeah, yeah, Snow Falling On Cedars, etc. But the Pacific Northwest has nowhere near the same levels of institutionalized racism. Seattle didn’t have Jim Crow laws in 1963. Also: evolution? Big hit in Seattle.

hoypolloy: brooklynmutt: Seattle Post-Intelligencer: David Horsey

mm. ok. i take offense to this. there are plenty of conservative nut jobs in the rest of the U.S. demanding the same thing. this just continues unfair stereotypes of the South.

It’s not unfair at all. The stereotypes exist because they reinforce a basic truth: the South is still fighting the Civil War.
The governor of Texas is talking about secession. Not in 1859, but in 2009. Tenured professors from accredited universities are actually holding conferences discussing the possibility of withdrawing from the union. Right now. Today.
The Confederate flag, which is quite literally a symbol of treason, is proudly displayed in a number of state flags and capitols, to say nothing of it’s cultural prevalence.
Xenophobia runs wild, in measurable disproportion to the rest of the country. The teabaggers, the birthers … what, you think these guys are based out of Seattle?
Sure, there are sectors of wingnuttery outside of the South. I would point to the White Pride movement in Montana and Idaho, or the nativism in Bakersfield or Orange County, also the religious fundamentalism in Utah and parts of Colorado. But none of them rival the sheer size and concentration of the South.
We have data. If you’re offended, get them to stop doing the offensive stuff. It didn’t work for Lincoln. Eisenhower had to send in the 101st Airborne. Maybe you’ll have better luck.

hoypolloybrooklynmuttSeattle Post-Intelligencer: David Horsey

mm. ok. i take offense to this. there are plenty of conservative nut jobs in the rest of the U.S. demanding the same thing. this just continues unfair stereotypes of the South.

It’s not unfair at all. The stereotypes exist because they reinforce a basic truth: the South is still fighting the Civil War.

The governor of Texas is talking about secession. Not in 1859, but in 2009. Tenured professors from accredited universities are actually holding conferences discussing the possibility of withdrawing from the union. Right now. Today.

The Confederate flag, which is quite literally a symbol of treason, is proudly displayed in a number of state flags and capitols, to say nothing of it’s cultural prevalence.

Xenophobia runs wild, in measurable disproportion to the rest of the country. The teabaggers, the birthers … what, you think these guys are based out of Seattle?

Sure, there are sectors of wingnuttery outside of the South. I would point to the White Pride movement in Montana and Idaho, or the nativism in Bakersfield or Orange County, also the religious fundamentalism in Utah and parts of Colorado. But none of them rival the sheer size and concentration of the South.

We have data. If you’re offended, get them to stop doing the offensive stuff. It didn’t work for Lincoln. Eisenhower had to send in the 101st Airborne. Maybe you’ll have better luck.