Unbranded; without a registered trademark.

 

Aaron Paul being confused by fashion

Everyone else is reviewing the clothes. Aaron Paul is trying to decode their faces.

(Source: kateoplis)

It ain’t broke. Fuck off. She’s perfect.

It ain’t broke. Fuck off. She’s perfect.

"A gentleman need never ask the time; a gentleman need never ask for a match."

"A gentleman need never ask the time; a gentleman need never ask for a match."

Love this ad.

The narration is pitch-perfect. The temptation to layer in douchey/wealth overtones must have been pretty big. That they focused on craftsmanship over luxury was probably dictated by the economic climate. Really dig the description of the lapel process.

"When there’s a better way to make a suit, we’ll change."

Hear the sadness, too?

The finish was such a letdown. I wouldn’t buy a Chrysler with your trust fund. They’re not stylish cars, no matter the pedigree. Nice nod to the skyscraper, though.

And it wasn’t just the black kids. That entire generation had more style in their pinky finger than the boomers or millennials could even shake a stick at.

And it wasn’t just the black kids. That entire generation had more style in their pinky finger than the boomers or millennials could even shake a stick at.

Parisian protesters, we’re never going to take you seriously while you look so fabulous.

Parisian protesters, we’re never going to take you seriously while you look so fabulous.

I understand the impulse.
We all want to subvert “The Wedding.” The institution is outmoded and the industry surrounding the event is parasitic. So the temptation is to rebel, to add the odd detail which says I Don’t Take This Pageantry Seriously.
But I’ve seen Cons at so many nuptials now that they’ve become the norm. More than that, they’re an improvement on the norm. Tuxedo shoes are flimsy and overly shiny. You can’t wear them with anything other than a tuxedo—which I guess is the point.
But Converse are fairly versatile, and comfy! especially when you have to stay standing for long periods of time, like ceremonies and reception lines and photos and dances. I’ve seen state senators take the oath of office wearing them. And observe how the white accents the black, looking for all the world like a pair of spats. My opinion? It works. It’s actually a version of formal wear. Because the newness of a fresh pair of Chucks always stands out. Maybe it’s just my generation, but that’s an occasion in its own right. That rubber only stays white for a day or so.
So when do we reach the tipping point? When does it, ironically, become tradition? When does the kid whose father got married wearing Chucks say, “By God, if they were good enough for Dad…” Kids grow up seeing the wedding photos on the wall.
My back-of-the-envelope calculation says we’re already there. You figure Kurt Cobain, who popularized black Chucks, got married in ‘92. The baby on the cover of Nevemind is 19 years old. So we’re due, right?

I understand the impulse.

We all want to subvert “The Wedding.” The institution is outmoded and the industry surrounding the event is parasitic. So the temptation is to rebel, to add the odd detail which says I Don’t Take This Pageantry Seriously.

But I’ve seen Cons at so many nuptials now that they’ve become the norm. More than that, they’re an improvement on the norm. Tuxedo shoes are flimsy and overly shiny. You can’t wear them with anything other than a tuxedo—which I guess is the point.

But Converse are fairly versatile, and comfy! especially when you have to stay standing for long periods of time, like ceremonies and reception lines and photos and dances. I’ve seen state senators take the oath of office wearing them. And observe how the white accents the black, looking for all the world like a pair of spats. My opinion? It works. It’s actually a version of formal wear. Because the newness of a fresh pair of Chucks always stands out. Maybe it’s just my generation, but that’s an occasion in its own right. That rubber only stays white for a day or so.

So when do we reach the tipping point? When does it, ironically, become tradition? When does the kid whose father got married wearing Chucks say, “By God, if they were good enough for Dad…” Kids grow up seeing the wedding photos on the wall.

My back-of-the-envelope calculation says we’re already there. You figure Kurt Cobain, who popularized black Chucks, got married in ‘92. The baby on the cover of Nevemind is 19 years old. So we’re due, right?

On the Fly:

… a great watch blog called Hodinkee passes on the  story of the Philadelphia Phillies pitcher, Roy Halladay. After throwing  a perfect game in late May, he bought the entire organization —  teammates, batboys, PR people — a Baume et Mercier watch with  an engraved message on the back reading, “We did it together. Thanks,  Roy Halladay.”
60 watches in all. A class act. Read  the 3 paragraph story in full here. 

On the Fly:

… a great watch blog called Hodinkee passes on the story of the Philadelphia Phillies pitcher, Roy Halladay. After throwing a perfect game in late May, he bought the entire organization — teammates, batboys, PR people — a Baume et Mercier watch with an engraved message on the back reading, “We did it together. Thanks, Roy Halladay.”

60 watches in all. A class act. Read the 3 paragraph story in full here

This guy is peacocking like whoa.

This guy is peacocking like whoa.

(via thepoliticalpartygirl)
Forget the play clock, forget instant replay, forget drug testing standards. Can we all just agree to ban sportwear that does not correspond with team colors? We did we start tolerating this? Yesterday I saw a Giants cap in Dodger blue, which, forgive me, is where I draw the fucking line. Why not just fly the al-Queda flag at Ground Zero?
It’s a simple rule and I’d like it instituted immediately: If the item of clothing is not worn by a member of the team, the wearer is subject to food or drink being thrown at said item by random passers-by. No gender is exempted from this rule. It might even boost concession sales. We can’t stop the owners from merchandising this crap, but we can stop fans from buying it.

(via thepoliticalpartygirl)

Forget the play clock, forget instant replay, forget drug testing standards. Can we all just agree to ban sportwear that does not correspond with team colors? We did we start tolerating this? Yesterday I saw a Giants cap in Dodger blue, which, forgive me, is where I draw the fucking line. Why not just fly the al-Queda flag at Ground Zero?

It’s a simple rule and I’d like it instituted immediately: If the item of clothing is not worn by a member of the team, the wearer is subject to food or drink being thrown at said item by random passers-by. No gender is exempted from this rule. It might even boost concession sales. We can’t stop the owners from merchandising this crap, but we can stop fans from buying it.