Unbranded; without a registered trademark.

 

newsweek:

When a smartphone user opens Angry Birds, the popular game application, and starts slinging birds at chortling green pigs, spy agencies have plotted how to lurk in the background to snatch data revealing the player’s location, age, sex and other personal information, according to secret British intelligence documents.
In their globe-spanning surveillance for terrorism suspects and other targets, the National Security Agency and its British counterpart have been trying to exploit a basic byproduct of modern telecommunications: With each new generation of mobile phone technology, ever greater amounts of personal data pour onto networks where spies can pick it up.
According to dozens of previously undisclosed classified documents, among the most valuable of those unintended intelligence tools are so-called leaky apps that spew everything from users’ smartphone identification codes to where they have been that day.
The N.S.A. and Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters were working together on how to collect and store data from dozens of smartphone apps by 2007, according to the documents, provided by Edward J. Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor.
Since then, the agencies have traded recipes for grabbing location and planning data when a target uses Google Maps, and for vacuuming up address books, buddy lists, phone logs and the geographic data embedded in photos when someone sends a post to the mobile versions of Facebook, Flickr, LinkedIn, Twitter and other services.

newsweek:

When a smartphone user opens Angry Birds, the popular game application, and starts slinging birds at chortling green pigs, spy agencies have plotted how to lurk in the background to snatch data revealing the player’s location, age, sex and other personal information, according to secret British intelligence documents.

In their globe-spanning surveillance for terrorism suspects and other targets, the National Security Agency and its British counterpart have been trying to exploit a basic byproduct of modern telecommunications: With each new generation of mobile phone technology, ever greater amounts of personal data pour onto networks where spies can pick it up.

According to dozens of previously undisclosed classified documents, among the most valuable of those unintended intelligence tools are so-called leaky apps that spew everything from users’ smartphone identification codes to where they have been that day.

The N.S.A. and Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters were working together on how to collect and store data from dozens of smartphone apps by 2007, according to the documents, provided by Edward J. Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor.

Since then, the agencies have traded recipes for grabbing location and planning data when a target uses Google Maps, and for vacuuming up address books, buddy lists, phone logs and the geographic data embedded in photos when someone sends a post to the mobile versions of Facebook, Flickr, LinkedIn, Twitter and other services.

No. Absolutely not. Never. You could be any number of people I want to avoid. Bugger off.

No. Absolutely not. Never. You could be any number of people I want to avoid. Bugger off.

I’m kind of shocked.
Who will protect the children?

I’m kind of shocked.

Who will protect the children?

Whoa, hey, what?
I thought Apple’s iTunes policy for iPhone apps was really strict.

Whoa, hey, what?

I thought Apple’s iTunes policy for iPhone apps was really strict.

Geez iPhone, you don’t have to be an asshole about it.

Geez iPhone, you don’t have to be an asshole about it.

Dad is not impressed by Steve Jobs’ innovations in mobile communication technology.

Dad is not impressed by Steve Jobs’ innovations in mobile communication technology.

The iPhone 4’s camera function makes movie recommendations. It favors arty thrillers, but it’s better than Rotten Tomatoes.

The iPhone 4’s camera function makes movie recommendations. It favors arty thrillers, but it’s better than Rotten Tomatoes.

… let’s be clear here. This story was blown out of proportion. Does the iPhone 4 have a spot that, when blocked, causes signal attenuation? Yes, as do all modern smartphones. Is this situation acerbated by the fact that the iPhone 4′s antenna is placed outside of the casing? Yes, but that decision demonstrably improves reception in the vast majority of situations. The bottom line is, this was a “debacle” almost entirely created by the press.

Dear Steve Jobs:

I love my new iPhone. It’s fast and shiny and all that I’ve come to expect from your marvelous cult company.

But I was promised reception issues.

There were many, many pixels rearranged on the subject of these horrible, inexcusable reception issues. Thousands of tech writers screamed bloody murder over the fact that if one held the iPhone 4 in a certain way, it would loose bars, slowly cut out, then drop the call.

I WAS VERY MUCH LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS FEATURE, STEVE JOBS.

MY NEW IPHONE DOES NOT HAVE THIS FEATURE, STEVE JOBS.

WTF? I had two dreaded phone calls I was putting off until I was able to make them with my iPhone 4. Now I have to make them. In full iPhone 4 Att&t fidelity, which as of this moment, is crystal clear. I am not happy. I’ve spent all weekend trying to lose bars in various locales around San Francisco. This is bullshit.

Does anyone else have the magical reception button on their iPhone? Can we trade?

Whoa. The location stamp on every single one of my iPhone photos creeps me out.

Whoa. The location stamp on every single one of my iPhone photos creeps me out.

Jobs can’t get a cell signal for his iPhone presentation, he asks “any suggestions” someone in the audience yells “Verizon!”

Best moment of the day. (via soupsoup)