Unbranded; without a registered trademark.

 

We Need To Talk About Facebook

Just to give a short outline of the problem. By using Facebook, activists do not just make their own communication, their opinion, their ‘likes’, etc. transparent and available for processing. Instead - and we consider this far more important - they expose structures and individuals who themselves have little or nothing to do with Facebook. Facebook’s capability to search the net for relationships, similarities etc. is difficult to comprehend for lay people. The chatter on Facebook reproduces political structures for the authorities and for companies. These can be searched, sorted and aggregated not just in order to obtain precise statements regarding social relations, key people, etc., but also in order to make predictions, from which regularities can be deduced. Next to mobile phones, Facebook is the most subtle, cheapest and best surveillance technology available.

 

We Need To Talk About Facebook

Just to give a short outline of the problem. By using Facebook, activists do not just make their own communication, their opinion, their ‘likes’, etc. transparent and available for processing. Instead - and we consider this far more important - they expose structures and individuals who themselves have little or nothing to do with Facebook. Facebook’s capability to search the net for relationships, similarities etc. is difficult to comprehend for lay people. The chatter on Facebook reproduces political structures for the authorities and for companies. These can be searched, sorted and aggregated not just in order to obtain precise statements regarding social relations, key people, etc., but also in order to make predictions, from which regularities can be deduced. Next to mobile phones, Facebook is the most subtle, cheapest and best surveillance technology available.

 

newsweek: Summers, writing on Tech Shifts:

On Oct. 1, The Social Network, an  Aaron Sorkin–penned movie about the site’s controversial founding, hits  theaters. A draft screenplay circulating now is a brutal read. Based on  Ben Mezrich’s 2009 book The Accidental Billionaires, it portrays  Zuckerberg as a borderline autistic, entirely ruthless conniver. Nothing  sways public opinion like a movie—and this scorcher could counteract  the entire body of good press Facebook has received till now.

newsweek: Summers, writing on Tech Shifts:

On Oct. 1, The Social Network, an Aaron Sorkin–penned movie about the site’s controversial founding, hits theaters. A draft screenplay circulating now is a brutal read. Based on Ben Mezrich’s 2009 book The Accidental Billionaires, it portrays Zuckerberg as a borderline autistic, entirely ruthless conniver. Nothing sways public opinion like a movie—and this scorcher could counteract the entire body of good press Facebook has received till now.

When I tell you Justin Timberlake is playing him in the movie, know this: I am not kidding.

When I tell you Justin Timberlake is playing him in the movie, know this: I am not kidding.

Apparently Facebook uses a mostly blue color scheme because blue is the color of trust. Teehee.

soupsoup:

That 13 to 17 year old group is the next generation of social networkers, and they are the 2nd least interested in Facebook.
18 to 25 care about Facebook cause they grew up on it, but the interest falls off as they leave that age bracket.
Your mom and dad are on Facebook. 13 to 17 year olds don’t want to social network with their parents, they’re going to go elsewhere.
Facebook will fall off a cliff in the next five years for multiple reasons, and privacy concerns are just one of them. A major factor is that it’s going to be less and less cool to be on Facebook, and I think it already is, ask some millennials. They’re probably already on to the next thing that is the next Facebook.

Except, what is that next thing? I’m a Gen Xer and I’ve more or less stopped Faebooking too, since everyone’s mom signed up. I haven’t moved on and I’m more than willing to. I was on the leading edge of Friendster, Myspace, FB then Twitter. But I don’t see anything else coming down the pike. Suggestions?

soupsoup:

That 13 to 17 year old group is the next generation of social networkers, and they are the 2nd least interested in Facebook.

18 to 25 care about Facebook cause they grew up on it, but the interest falls off as they leave that age bracket.

Your mom and dad are on Facebook. 13 to 17 year olds don’t want to social network with their parents, they’re going to go elsewhere.

Facebook will fall off a cliff in the next five years for multiple reasons, and privacy concerns are just one of them. A major factor is that it’s going to be less and less cool to be on Facebook, and I think it already is, ask some millennials. They’re probably already on to the next thing that is the next Facebook.

Except, what is that next thing? I’m a Gen Xer and I’ve more or less stopped Faebooking too, since everyone’s mom signed up. I haven’t moved on and I’m more than willing to. I was on the leading edge of Friendster, Myspace, FB then Twitter. But I don’t see anything else coming down the pike. Suggestions?