Unbranded; without a registered trademark.

 

Vida Blue put his honorary 2010 ring up for auction, (hopefully a lifetime of béisbol memorabilia clogged his shelf-space, not something more desperate).

Closing bid: $18,678.

"People who actually work in the city, and I’m talking about normal people, like teachers and policeman and firemen and city workers and shop-owners—they can’t live here. 
They can’t live here because this place has been overrun by crazy money that’s being tossed around like sacks of bananas to people who are ‘solving’ shit that doesn’t solve any real problem for any real human being, except coming up with shit like $150 smoke detectors for rich people. And it’s turned what used to be a fucking magnificent city into a bedroom community for the Peninsula.”
—Mike Monteiro

"People who actually work in the city, and I’m talking about normal people, like teachers and policeman and firemen and city workers and shop-ownersthey can’t live here

They can’t live here because this place has been overrun by crazy money that’s being tossed around like sacks of bananas to people who are ‘solving’ shit that doesn’t solve any real problem for any real human being, except coming up with shit like $150 smoke detectors for rich people. And it’s turned what used to be a fucking magnificent city into a bedroom community for the Peninsula.”

Mike Monteiro

"… Leaving home does something to your sense of identity. Either you become more of that place than you ever were while you lived there, or your identity calcifies around the rejection of this place. It is challenging to inhabit the space between these two positions. All of these perspectives on the same place. It’s dizzying.”
- Lauren Elkin

"… Leaving home does something to your sense of identity. Either you become more of that place than you ever were while you lived there, or your identity calcifies around the rejection of this place. It is challenging to inhabit the space between these two positions. All of these perspectives on the same place. It’s dizzying.”

- Lauren Elkin

Everyone Thinks I'm Gay (But I'm Not)

I’d be lying if I said it wasn’t on my mind.

I’d be lying if I said it wasn’t on my mind.

webuiltthiscity:

I really wanted to buy this but just couldn’t stomach paying 25 bucks for a canvas bag. At the new Whole Foods.

Shit is getting absurd in this town.

webuiltthiscity:

I really wanted to buy this but just couldn’t stomach paying 25 bucks for a canvas bag. At the new Whole Foods.

Shit is getting absurd in this town.

bartdontlie:

That Express has this bullshit about paying tribute to the “rich tradition” of San Francisco and Union Square hanging outside their new location in the former Gold Dust Lounge really kind of pisses me right the fuck off. 
That’s like evicting someone from their home and then sending them a “wish you were here” postcard with a picture of their house on it a few months later. 
Fuck you, Express. I want my cheap Irish coffees and bloody marys back. 

bartdontlie:

That Express has this bullshit about paying tribute to the “rich tradition” of San Francisco and Union Square hanging outside their new location in the former Gold Dust Lounge really kind of pisses me right the fuck off. 

That’s like evicting someone from their home and then sending them a “wish you were here” postcard with a picture of their house on it a few months later. 

Fuck you, Express. I want my cheap Irish coffees and bloody marys back. 

What is the meaning of the line “Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown”?

Something horrible happens, a great injustice is done, powerful people get away with abusing that power, corruption continues and the weaker people must suffer for it — and that’s the way of things. In Chinatown, in the country, in the world.
"Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown" means "you can’t change things, it’s the way things are and the way they will be, regardless of how much you tilt at windmills." The line is about the futility of fighting injustices and darkness in the world. It’s about giving up and looking away, because nothing can be done anyway lest you become another casualty of injustice.
Chinatown is the world. Jake is everyone. Forgetting about it is what we all do anyway, and so what we may as well keep doing.

What is the meaning of the line “Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown”?

Something horrible happens, a great injustice is done, powerful people get away with abusing that power, corruption continues and the weaker people must suffer for it — and that’s the way of things. In Chinatown, in the country, in the world.

"Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown" means "you can’t change things, it’s the way things are and the way they will be, regardless of how much you tilt at windmills." The line is about the futility of fighting injustices and darkness in the world. It’s about giving up and looking away, because nothing can be done anyway lest you become another casualty of injustice.

Chinatown is the world. Jake is everyone. Forgetting about it is what we all do anyway, and so what we may as well keep doing.

West Oakland is the epicenter of all these changes. Margaret Gordon, a longtime West Oakland community leader, said in her immediate neighborhood, every home from which an African-American family has moved out is now occupied by non-African Americans. “The new people are mostly white and Asian, groups of young people,” she said. “Only a few of the people moving in have families.” Another longtime West Oakland resident, Chantel Burrell, summed up the comments of many of her neighbors: “This is the new San Francisco.